Wednesday, July 8, 2020

WW2 Fallen - B-17 bombardier Lawrence Grubisich

Lt. Lawrence Grubisich was a bombardier in the 490th Bombardment Group
https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/81077440/lawrence-edward-grubisich
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/490th_Bombardment_Group
Lawrence Edward Grubisich, Jr. never had a chance to reach 100 years old today. Instead, he sacrificed his life for our freedom.

If you have enjoyed reading the stories of the WW2 fallen, Can you help write some stories? It's a big project. The more help, the better. 
Announcing "The Stories Behind the Stars", see https://www.storiesbehindthestars.org.
This crowd-sourced national project has the goal of compiling stories of all 400,000+ of the US World War 2 fallen in one free-to-access central database. We are going to need a lot of volunteers.
Anyone visiting a war memorial or gravesite will be able to scan the name of the fallen with a smartphone and his story will appear on the phone.
    
Lawrence was born on July 8, 1920 in Illinois. His parents Lawrence and Vincenca were both born in Croatia, Austria-Hungary. They came to America before 1900. His father worked as a coal miner. Lawrence had three older brothers and two older sisters. By 1940 Lawrence had completed four years of high school. He was still living at home and was working as a carpenter.

He enlisted in the army in January 1942 and volunteered for the Army Air Forces in November 1942 and applied to become an officer. He eventually became a second lieutenant in the 848th Bombardment Squadron, 490th Bombardment Group, 8th Air Force which was equipped with B-17 Flying Fortresses. The 490th BG arrived in England in April 1944 and began flying bombing missions in May.

On October 6, 1944, Lt. Grubisich was the bombardier on B-17 43-38180 on a mission to bomb Berlin. His plane was shot down by flak and crashed at Spandau. He was originally listed as missing in action. Four of the crew were captured by the Germans. Lt. Grubisich and four others were killed.

His grave is at Saint Joseph Cemetery in Canton, Illinois.

Thank you Lt. Grubisich for your sacrifice. Let's Earn It for Lawrence.

This is one of the final 100 stories (57) to be written as part of this project which ends on September 2, 2020, the 75th anniversary of the end of World War II. At that time more than 1,370 men and women will have been profiled. The project will live on in an expanded program to write the stories of all 400,000+ US World War II fallen. Visit www.storiesbehindthestars.org to learn more. We welcome your continued support and interest and encourage you to help write some of these stories.

Last year on this date I profiled B-17 pilot John McGarry. You can read about John here.

On behalf of the fallen, if you would like to see more people become aware of this project to honor the WW2 fallen, be sure to share with others on Twitter, Facebook, etc. Thanks for your interest!

I created this video to explain why I started this project: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vXt8QA481lY.


Follow on Twitter @ww2fallen100
Please consider joining the public Facebook group to increase the exposure of this project. Go to: WW2 Fallen 100

WW2 Fallen 100 is supported by

The Greatest GENERATIONS Foundation

“Where Every Day is Memorial Day”

Tuesday, July 7, 2020

WW2 Fallen - Lewis Walker, 44th Infantry Division

PFC Lewis Walker served in the 44th Infantry Division.
https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/195467772/lewis-franklin-walker
http://www.combatreels.com/44th_infantry_division_1944-1945_dvd.cfm 
Lewis Franklin Walker never had a chance to reach 100 years old today. Instead, he sacrificed his life for our freedom.

If you have enjoyed reading the stories of the WW2 fallen, Can you help write some stories? It's a big project. The more help, the better. 
Announcing "The Stories Behind the Stars", see https://www.storiesbehindthestars.org.
This crowd-sourced national project has the goal of compiling stories of all 400,000+ of the US World War 2 fallen in one free-to-access central database. We are going to need a lot of volunteers.
Anyone visiting a war memorial or gravesite will be able to scan the name of the fallen with a smartphone and his story will appear on the phone.
    
Lewis was born on July 7, 1920 in Ohio. His parents Leis and Amelia were also both born in Ohio. His father worked as a coal miner. Lewis had two older sisters and one younger brother. By 1940 Lewis was still living at home. He had completed four years of high school and worked as a coal miner.

He was drafted into the army in February 1943. He became a private first class in Company L, 3rd Battalion, 324th Infantry Regiment, 44th Infantry Division. The 44th ID was sent to Europe in September 1944. It joined the 7th Army's engagement with the enemy in the Vosges Mountains one month later.

The 44th ID fought the Germans in area of the old Maginot Line in December 1944. After six days of fighting it captured Fort Simserhof on December 20. It was then on the defensive to keep the Germans from crossing the Blies River. PFC Walker was killed during this engagement on December 22, 1944. PFC Walker was one of more than 1,000 men from the 44th ID killed or missing during the war.

His grave is at Beech Grove Cemetery in Pomeroy, Ohio.

Thank you PFC Walker for your sacrifice. Let's Earn It for Lewis.

This is one of the final 100 stories (58) to be written as part of this project which ends on September 2, 2020, the 75th anniversary of the end of World War II. At that time more than 1,370 men and women will have been profiled. The project will live on in an expanded program to write the stories of all 400,000+ US World War II fallen. Visit www.storiesbehindthestars.org to learn more. We welcome your continued support and interest and encourage you to help write some of these stories.

Last year on this date I profiled P-51 pilot Norman McDonald. You can read about Norman here.

On behalf of the fallen, if you would like to see more people become aware of this project to honor the WW2 fallen, be sure to share with others on Twitter, Facebook, etc. Thanks for your interest!

I created this video to explain why I started this project: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vXt8QA481lY.


Follow on Twitter @ww2fallen100
Please consider joining the public Facebook group to increase the exposure of this project. Go to: WW2 Fallen 100

WW2 Fallen 100 is supported by

The Greatest GENERATIONS Foundation

“Where Every Day is Memorial Day”

Monday, July 6, 2020

WW2 Iwo Jima Fallen - William Holmes, 5th Marine Division

Sgt. William Holmes served with the 28th Marine Regiment on Iwo Jima.
https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/40968366/william-lee-holmes
https://www.pinterest.com/pin/531987774730890525/
William Lee Holmes never had a chance to reach 100 years old today. Instead, he sacrificed his life for our freedom.

If you have enjoyed reading the stories of the WW2 fallen, Can you help write some stories? It's a big project. The more help, the better. 
Announcing "The Stories Behind the Stars", see https://www.storiesbehindthestars.org.
This crowd-sourced national project has the goal of compiling stories of all 400,000+ of the US World War 2 fallen in one free-to-access central database. We are going to need a lot of volunteers.
Anyone visiting a war memorial or gravesite will be able to scan the name of the fallen with a smartphone and his story will appear on the phone.
    
He was born on July 6, 1920 in Brigham City, Utah. His parents William and Emma were also both born in Idaho and Utah, respectively. His father worked as a newspaper editor at the Box Elder Journal. William had two older sisters and on older brother. He worked for the Box Elder News Journal and also the Salt Lake Tribune where he was a linotype operator.

He enlisted in the US Marines in August 1942. After basic training he was assigned to the troop transport USS Mount Vernon for 14 months. The navy used this former luxury ship to transport troops between the American west coast and New Zealand & Australia. In January 1944 he married Frances Wright. The marriage was performed by David O. McKay, an apostle who later became president of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. They had one son.

In October 1944 he was sent overseas for one last time. He became a sergeant in Company G, 2nd Battalion, 28th Marine Regiment, 5th Marine Division. The 5th Marine Division left for the Pacific in January 1945. It landed on Iwo Jima on February 19, 1945, the first day of battle. It was men from the 2nd Battalion, 28th Marine Regiment who raised the famous flag on Mt. Suribachi, though they were from Company E.

The 2nd Battalion was the second unit to land on Green Beach, the far left of the assault. It hit the black beaches at 0935 on February 19, 1945.  The 28th Marines faced hundreds of well positioned defensive strongpoints. Advances were measured in yards as they moved in the direction of Mouthfeels Suribachi. Sgt. Holmes was wounded in action and died on February 20, 1945. His son was born on March 9. At that point the family was not yet aware that he had died.

The 5th Marine Division was engaged in combat for 36 days. It had the highest casualty rate among the three Marine divisions that fought on Iwo Jima. Nearly 2,500 5th Marine Division leathernecks were killed and another 6,200 plus were wounded. 

His grave is at Wasatch Lawn Memorial Park in Millcreek, Utah. I don't know what happened to his widow or son.

Thank you Sgt. Holmes for your sacrifice. Let's Earn It for William.

This is one of the final 100 stories (59) to be written as part of this project which ends on September 2, 2020, the 75th anniversary of the end of World War II. At that time more than 1,370 men and women will have been profiled. The project will live on in an expanded program to write the stories of all 400,000+ US World War II fallen. Visit www.storiesbehindthestars.org to learn more. We welcome your continued support and interest and encourage you to help write some of these stories.

Last year on this date I profiled Battle of the Atlantic fallen Kenneth Barrus, USS Frederick C. Davis. You can read about Kenneth here.

On behalf of the fallen, if you would like to see more people become aware of this project to honor the WW2 fallen, be sure to share with others on Twitter, Facebook, etc. Thanks for your interest!

I created this video to explain why I started this project: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vXt8QA481lY.


Follow on Twitter @ww2fallen100
Please consider joining the public Facebook group to increase the exposure of this project. Go to: WW2 Fallen 100

WW2 Fallen 100 is supported by

The Greatest GENERATIONS Foundation

“Where Every Day is Memorial Day”

Sunday, July 5, 2020

WW2 Fallen - B-17 co-pilot George DeVono

B-17 co-pilot George DeVono flew the B-17 Touch the Button Nell 2.
https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/183752128 https://b17flyingfortress.de/en/b17/42-38117-touch-the-button-nell-ii/

George Joseph Devono never had a chance to reach 100 years old today. Instead, he sacrificed his life for our freedom.


If you have enjoyed reading the stories of the WW2 fallen, Can you help write some stories? It's a big project. The more help, the better. 
Announcing "The Stories Behind the Stars", see https://www.storiesbehindthestars.org.
This crowd-sourced national project has the goal of compiling stories of all 400,000+ of the US World War 2 fallen in one free-to-access central database. We are going to need a lot of volunteers.
Anyone visiting a war memorial or gravesite will be able to scan the name of the fallen with a smartphone and his story will appear on the phone.
    

George was born on July 5, 1920 in Red Lion, Pennsylvania. His parents Frank and Armenia were both born in Italy and immigrated to the U.S. in 1901 and 1908 respectively. Frank worked as a tailor. George had two older brothers, two younger brothers, and a younger sister. He graduated from Dallastown High School and attended York Junior College. In 1940 Frank was living at home with his parents in Dallastown and working as a wood finisher. When he registered for the draft in February 1942, he was working for the York Ice Machinery Company in York, Pennsylvania.

 

He enlisted in the U.S. Army Air Corps in September 1942 and after flight training was commissioned as a 2nd Lieutenant. He served in the 535th Bomb Squadron of the 381st Bomb Group, Eighth Air Force. The 381st was activated on 3 November 1942 and in May 1943 deployed to England, where it was based at RAF Ridgewell and operated B-17 Flying Fortress heavy bombers in missions over France and Germany. 

 

According to the 535th squadron’s daily log, 2nd Lt. Devono joined the 381st as part of a replacement crew on 27 June 1944. He flew his first mission 4 July 1944, as co-pilot of B-17 42-38117, known as “Touch The Button Nell II”, assigned to bomb the La Riche airfield near Tours, France. The daily log states that there was neither flak nor enemy fighters encountered on the mission, and Lt. Devono’s plane was last seen in formation under control with all four engines operating, but failed to return to base. It was later determined that the aircraft crashed near the village of Persac, France. Lt. Devono was killed in action one day short of his 24th birthday, along with six other members of the crew. Two surviving crewmen were rescued by the French Resistance and eventually returned to action.

 

George Joseph Devono is buried in St. Joseph’s Cemetery, Dallastown, Pennsylvania. A monument memorializing the crew is located at the crash site in France.

 

Thank you Lt. Devono for your sacrifice. Let's Earn It for George.


This is one of the final 100 stories (61) to be written as part of this project which ends on September 2, 2020, the 75th anniversary of the end of World War II. At that time more than 1,370 men and women will have been profiled. The project will live on in an expanded program to write the stories of all 400,000+ US World War II fallen. Visit www.storiesbehindthestars.org to learn more. We welcome your continued support and interest and encourage you to help write some of these stories.

_____

This profile was written by Bob Fuerst. "I’m a NASA engineer, B-17 Flying Fortress enthusiast, and amateur genealogist so this kind of research is an ideal outlet for me. But more than anything, it’s a way to express my sincere appreciation for The Greatest Generation and the sacrifices that they made, especially those who made the ultimate sacrifice. They should never be forgotten and I’m grateful to Don for allowing me to play a small part in honoring them." 


Last year on this date I profiled Brandon Nadeau of the 1st Marine Division. You can read about Brandon here.


On behalf of the fallen, if you would like to see more people become aware of this project to honor the WW2 fallen, be sure to share with others on Twitter, Facebook, etc. Thanks for your interest!


I created this video to explain why I started this project: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vXt8QA481lY.

 

Follow on Twitter @ww2fallen100

Please consider joining the public Facebook group to increase the exposure of this project. Go to: WW2 Fallen 100

 

WW2 Fallen 100 is supported by

The Greatest GENERATIONS Foundation

“Where Every Day is Memorial Day”

http://www.tggf.org


Saturday, July 4, 2020

WW2 Fallen - B-17 waist gunner Kenneth Law

Tech Sergeant was a gunner who flew with the 351st Bombardment Group.
https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/153970935/kenneth-clyde-law
https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Flying_Fortresses_of_the_351st_Bomb_Group.jpg
 

For Independence Day, let us remember these words from the third verse of America the Beautiful, written by Katharine Lee Bates in 1911:

O beautiful for heroes proved
In liberating strife,
Who more than self their country loved
And mercy more than life!

Kenneth Clyde Law never had a chance to reach 100 years old today. Instead, he sacrificed his life for our freedom.

If you have enjoyed reading the stories of the WW2 fallen, Can you help write some stories? It's a big project. The more help, the better. 
Announcing "The Stories Behind the Stars", see https://www.storiesbehindthestars.org.
This crowd-sourced national project has the goal of compiling stories of all 400,000+ of the US World War 2 fallen in one free-to-access central database. We are going to need a lot of volunteers.
Anyone visiting a war memorial or gravesite will be able to scan the name of the fallen with a smartphone and his story will appear on the phone.
   
He was born on July 4, 1920 in Illinois. His parents Ira and Gladys were also both born in Illinois. His father worked as a farmer. Kenneth had an older brother and an older sister. By 1940 Kenneth had completed four years of college and was was still living at home. He worked as a garage repair mechanic.

He volunteered for the Army Air Forces on August 5, 1941. He reached the rank of tech sergeant in the 511th Bombardment Squadron, 351st Bombardment Group, 8th Air Force, which was equipped with B-17 Flying Fortresses. He was trained as a waist gunner. The 351st BG arrived in England in May 1943.

The target for August 6, 1944 was Berlin. The 351st BG lost five planes on that mission. One of them was B-17 43-37557, nicknamed Hubba Hubba, which was shot down by flak and crashed southwest of Potsdam. Sgt. Law was the only flyer from this plane that was killed when his parachute did not deploy. It was his sixth mission. The other eight men were captured by the Germans.

His cenotaph grave is at Linwood Cemetery, Galesburg, Illinois.

Thank you Sgt. Law for your sacrifice. Let's Earn It for Kenneth.

This is one of the final 100 stories (61) to be written as part of this project which ends on September 2, 2020, the 75th anniversary of the end of World War II. At that time more than 1,370 men and women will have been profiled. The project will live on in an expanded program to write the stories of all 400,000+ US World War II fallen. Visit www.storiesbehindthestars.org to learn more. We welcome your continued support and interest and encourage you to help write some of these stories.

Last year on this date I profiled Machinist Mate Robert Johnson, USS Swordfish. You can read about Robert here.

On behalf of the fallen, if you would like to see more people become aware of this project to honor the WW2 fallen, be sure to share with others on Twitter, Facebook, etc. Thanks for your interest!

I created this video to explain why I started this project: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vXt8QA481lY.


Follow on Twitter @ww2fallen100
Please consider joining the public Facebook group to increase the exposure of this project. Go to: WW2 Fallen 100

WW2 Fallen 100 is supported by

The Greatest GENERATIONS Foundation

“Where Every Day is Memorial Day”

Friday, July 3, 2020

WW2 Fallen - Silver Stars hero Clarence Coggins, who capture more than 900 Germans, 45th Infantry Division

Captain Clarence Coggins, 45th Infantry Division, once captured more than 900 Germans.
https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/131758243/clarence-elton-coggins
https://owlcation.com/humanities/1st-Lt-Clarence-E-Coggins-Oklahomas-Own-War-Hero

Clarence Elton Coggins never had a chance to reach 100 years old today. Instead, he sacrificed his life for our freedom.

If you have enjoyed reading the stories of the WW2 fallen, Can you help write some stories? It's a big project. The more help, the better. 
Announcing "The Stories Behind the Stars", see https://www.storiesbehindthestars.org.
This crowd-sourced national project has the goal of compiling stories of all 400,000+ of the US World War 2 fallen in one free-to-access central database. We are going to need a lot of volunteers.
Anyone visiting a war memorial or gravesite will be able to scan the name of the fallen with a smartphone and his story will appear on the phone.
   
Clarence was born on July 3, 1920 in Mississippi. His parents Arthur and Clara were both born in Mississippi. His father worked as a farmer and public school teacher. Clarence had one older sister. He graduated from Oklahoma A&M College where he participated in ROTC. While there he met Ethel Castiller whom he later married. They had one son.

He enlisted in the army in September 1941 when the Oklahoma National Guard was federalized as the 45th Infantry Division. By October 1942 he was a first lieutenant in Company E, 2nd Battalion, 179th Infantry Regiment, 45th Infantry Division. Before he could be deployed overseas, a medical evaluation found he was completely deaf in one ear so he was forced to stay behind. After multiple appeals he was able to rejoin his unit. 

I am not sure exactly when Lt. Coggins rejoined the 45th ID. It spent 238 days in battle in Sicily and Italy in 1943 and 1944. By the time it was pulled out of Italy to prepare for the invasion of Southern France, only 28% of its original men remained.

After landing in Southern France in August 1944, Lt. Coggins, a Company Commander, was on a reconnaissance patrol behind enemy lines on August 23 when he was captured. He convinced the Nazi commander of almost 1,000 German troops that they were surrounded by the Americans. The Germans had treated the local French rather badly so they decided that surrendering to the Americans would be the best option. They asked Lt. Coggins to arrange the surrender. Based on this achievement, he was promoted to the rank of captain and was in the HQ Company.

On January 7, 1945, Captain Coggins and a group of soldiers under his command were caught in an exposed position inside a small church. American artillery fire was landing all around because the enemy was that closed. Coggins arranged for the shelling to stop momentarily so his men could escape back to safety. Coggins was the last man out, giving the Germans more time to spot the move. He was shot and killed exiting the church. Note: a different source says he was killed when he stepped on a land mine. 

During his service Captain Coggins earned 2 Silver Stars, 1 Bronze Star, 4 Oak Leaf Clusters, 2 Purple Hearts and the Gold Star.

You can read much more about Captain Coggins in this article by Eric Standridge here

His grave is at Oakland Cemetery in Poteau, Oklahoma. His widow remarried and lived to age 98, dying in 2018. I don't know what happened to his son.

Thank you Captain Coggins for your sacrifice. Let's Earn It for Clarence.

This is one of the final 100 stories (62) to be written as part of this project which ends on September 2, 2020, the 75th anniversary of the end of World War II. At that time more than 1,370 men and women will have been profiled. The project will live on in an expanded program to write the stories of all 400,000+ US World War II fallen. Visit www.storiesbehindthestars.org to learn more. We welcome your continued support and interest and encourage you to help write some of these stories.

Last year on this date I profiled Guadalcanal fallen and Distinguished Service Cross hero Edward Krygowski, Americal Division. You can read about Edward here.

On behalf of the fallen, if you would like to see more people become aware of this project to honor the WW2 fallen, be sure to share with others on Twitter, Facebook, etc. Thanks for your interest!

I created this video to explain why I started this project: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vXt8QA481lY.


Follow on Twitter @ww2fallen100
Please consider joining the public Facebook group to increase the exposure of this project. Go to: WW2 Fallen 100

WW2 Fallen 100 is supported by

The Greatest GENERATIONS Foundation

“Where Every Day is Memorial Day”

Thursday, July 2, 2020

WW2 Normandy Fallen - Riley Hurst, 90th Infantry Division

Sgt. Riley Hurst served in the 90th Infantry Division in Normandy.
https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/66959398/riley-d_-hurst
http://www.combatreels.com/90th_infantry_division_normandy_dvd.cfm

Riley Hurst never had a chance to reach 100 years old today. Instead, he sacrificed his life for our freedom.

If you have enjoyed reading the stories of the WW2 fallen, Can you help write some stories? It's a big project. The more help, the better. 
Announcing "The Stories Behind the Stars", see https://www.storiesbehindthestars.org.
This crowd-sourced national project has the goal of compiling stories of all 400,000+ of the US World War 2 fallen in one free-to-access central database. We are going to need a lot of volunteers.
Anyone visiting a war memorial or gravesite will be able to scan the name of the fallen with a smartphone and his story will appear on the phone.
   
Riley was born on July 2, 1920 in Ponca City, Oklahoma. His parents William and Lydia were born in Tennessee and Kansas, respectively. His father had a second grade education and was a farmer by trade. Riley had two older sisters and two older brothers. Riley was a defensive back on his high school football team.

Riley and his brother Arthur both registered for the draft in February 1942. After joining the army he ended up serving in the 358th Infantry Regiment, 90th Infantry Division (Nicknamed Tough 'Ombres) and had the rank of Tec 4. The 90th Infantry Division arrived in England in April 1944, scheduled to take part in the Normandy invasion. The 358th Infantry Regiment landed on Utah Beach on June 8, 1944 (D+2).


Riley was killed in action in France, July 7, 1944. The 90th ID website has this information about the time when he died:


"The preceding battles in the Normandy Hedgerow country had been rough but the ensuing battles were to be equal tests of the mettle of the fighting men of the 358th Infantry. On the July 3rd, a memorable day in the battle of France, the Division launched an attack southwest against a strong enemy line defended by determined, fanatical paratroopers and SS men. On the first day of the attack, the rains came and the damp dismal weather of the succeeding days made the battle one of the most unforgettable in history. Casualties were heavy and communications and supply were hampered by heavy enemy shelling. The 2nd Battalion charged through to Les Sablons, bypassed it, and continued south, while the First Battalion fought for St. Jores. The Third Battalion, initially in reserve, moved up to Les Sablons to clean out the town and tie in with the Second Battalion."


In 1940, Ponca City was a town of just over 16,000 residents. Altogether, Ponca City High School saw 1,515 of their students or former students take up arms in World War Two. Riley is one of the seventy one names on the plaque commissioned in 1948 to memorialize those did not return.


His grave is at the Oddfellows Cemetery in Ponca City, OK.


I was born in Ponca City and passed this plaque daily when I was in high school. Ponca City is also the home of Waddy Young that piloted a B-29 (Waddy’s Wagon) that never returned in January, 1945. There are 71 names on this plaque and it is now interesting to see the last names of uncles and grandfather’s of classmates from the past.


Thank you Sgt. Hurst for your sacrifice. Let's Earn It for Riley.

*******
This profile was researched and written by Chris Prough - "Lives in Mount Pleasant, IA with his lovely wife Susanne and their eight children where there are no mountains and the jury is still out on the whole "pleasant" thing. Lover of history since a child. I believe in this endeavor as my own great uncle, Harold Ozmun, was profiled on December 15, 2018. Many thanks to Don for affording me the privilege to help him out."

This is one of the final 100 stories (63) to be written as part of this project which ends on September 2, 2020, the 75th anniversary of the end of World War II. At that time more than 1,370 men and women will have been profiled. The project will live on in an expanded program to write the stories of all 400,000+ US World War II fallen. Visit www.storiesbehindthestars.org to learn more. We welcome your continued support and interest and encourage you to help write some of these stories.

Last year on this date I profiled B-24 flight engineer Mark Ebert. You can read about Mark here.

On behalf of the fallen, if you would like to see more people become aware of this project to honor the WW2 fallen, be sure to share with others on Twitter, Facebook, etc. Thanks for your interest!

I created this video to explain why I started this project: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vXt8QA481lY.


Follow on Twitter @ww2fallen100
Please consider joining the public Facebook group to increase the exposure of this project. Go to: WW2 Fallen 100

WW2 Fallen 100 is supported by

The Greatest GENERATIONS Foundation

“Where Every Day is Memorial Day”