Wednesday, July 26, 2017

WW2 Fallen - A-36 pilot Everett Fager

Lt. Everett Fager flew the A-36th Apache in Italy.
https://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=52418298&ref=acom
http://www.collingsfoundation.org/aircrafts/north-american-36-apache/ 

Everett E. Fager never had a chance to reach 100 years old today. Instead, he sacrificed his life for our freedom.

He was born on July 26, 1917 in Kansas. His parents were also both born in Kansas. All of his grandparents were from Sweden. His father worked as a farmer. Everett was an only child. His mother died in 1920 and his father never remarried. By 1940 Everett had completed high school and moved off the farm. He was a college student in Manhattan, Kansas, probably at Kansas State University.

After two years of college Everett enlisted in the US Army Air Corp. He was an aviation cadet and learned to fly fighter planes - possibly P-40s and certainly A-36 Apaches.

He became a first lieutenant in the 526th Fighter Squadron, 86th Fighter Group, 12th Air Force. The 86th Fighter Group first engaged the enemy in supporting the invasion of Sicily in July 1943. It went on to cover the landing at Salerno in September. The A-36 Apache was a version of the more common P-51. It was modified to specialize as a dive bomber to support ground operations. Lt. Fager was credited with one kill during his brief service.

According to one source while on a trip in a command car to Cacerta, Italy on October 23 (perhaps to liaison with units his squadron was supporting) Lt. Fager was strafed by British Spitfires flown by Germans. It is also possible that it was a tragic case of friendly fire. Fager was wounded in the face, side and leg. These wounds resulted in complications that caused a blood clot that led to his death on October 30, 1943.

His grave is at Rapp Cemetery in Osage County, Kansas.

Thank you Everett for your sacrifice. Let's Earn It for Everett.


On behalf of the fallen, if you would like to see more people become aware of this project to honor the WW2 fallen, be sure to share with others on Twitter, Facebook, etc. Thanks for your interest!

To mark having over 100,000 visits to my project to honor the fallen of WW2 on their 100th birthdate, I created this video to share. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vXt8QA481lY


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Tuesday, July 25, 2017

WW2 Fallen - Medal of Honor hero Robert Roeder, 88th Infantry Division

Captain Robert E. Roeder, 88th Infantry Division, earned the Medal of Honor at Mt. Battaglia.
https://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=8905318&ref=acom
http://theirfinesthour.net/2014/09/captain-robert-e-roeder-usa-september-27-28-1944/ 

Robert E. Roeder never had a chance to reach 100 years old today. Instead, he sacrificed his life for our freedom.

He was born on July 25, 1917 in Pennsylvania. His parents were also both born in Pennsylvania. His father worked as a farmer and later as a painter. Robert had one older brother. He enlisted in the army on June 5, 1936. His older brother enlisted in the army in February 1941 and survived the war.

Robert took a liking to the army life where he was quickly assigned to be a squad leader. He was stationed in Hawaii at the time the Japanese attacked Pearl Harbor. With the start of the war, the Army needed experienced leaders like Robert so he became an officer candidate. He rose through the ranks to become a captain and the commanding officer of Company G, 2nd Battalion, 350th Infantry Regiment, 88th Infantry Division (nicknamed "Fighting Blue Devils").

The 88th Infantry Division joined the fighting in Italy in February 1944. A month later, Captain Roeder's 54 year old father died. Six months of combat brought the Fighting Blue Devils to the Gothic Line.

On September 27, 1944 Captain Roeder was ordered to take and hold Mount Battaglia with his Company G. Many of his men were new reinforcements with no combat experience. After taking the hill, Roeder's men were subject to tremendous and incessant artillery barrages. The Germans were determined to retake the hill -- they launch five separate counter-attacks in fourteen hours including a bayonet charge that killed many of the Company G troops. Despite the danger of the continuous shelling, Captain Roeder moved from foxhole to foxhole, encouraging his men to hold on.

During a sixth attack at daybreak on September 28, Captain Roeder was in an exposed position and was wounded in the shoulder by a shell fragment that also rendered him unconscious. He was taken to the command post located at a castle on the hill. He regained consciousness, and despite much blood loss, refused to be treated. He grabbed the rifle of a dead soldier and dragged himself to a stone wall were he fired point blank on the Germans overrunning the hill. He was killed by a shell that landed near where he was fighting.

Inspired by Captain Roeder's fearless leadership, his men repulsed every German attack and kept possession of the hill. By the time Company G was relieved, all its officers were either killed or wounded and the company was down to 50 men.

His grave is at Arlington National Cemetery.

Thank you Robert for your sacrifice. Let's Earn It for Robert.


On behalf of the fallen, if you would like to see more people become aware of this project to honor the WW2 fallen, be sure to share with others on Twitter, Facebook, etc. Thanks for your interest!

To mark having over 100,000 visits to my project to honor the fallen of WW2 on their 100th birthdate, I created this video to share. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vXt8QA481lY


Follow on Twitter @ww2fallen100
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Monday, July 24, 2017

WW2 Fallen - D-Day casualty Howard Littell, 101st Airborne Division

Lt. Howard Littell was in the same 3rd Battalion Headquarters Company, in the 506th Parachute Regiment, as his commanding officer Lt. Colonel Robert Wolverton, shown here checking his chute the evening before D-Day.
https://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=23992685&ref=acom
https://www.pinterest.com/pin/538672805418191398/
Howard D. Littell never had a chance to reach 100 years old today. Instead, he sacrificed his life for our freedom.

He was born on July 24, 1917 in New Jersey. His parents were also both born in New Jersey. His father worked as a coal dealer and died in 1937. Howard had one younger sister. By 1940 Howard had completed four years of high school and was still living with his mother and sister and worked as an accountant.

He enlisted in the army infantry on September 14, 1940. He was drawn to volunteer for the airborne and was recognized to be officer material. He became a first lieutenant in the Headquarters Company, 3rd Battalion, 506th Parachute Regiment, 101st Airborne Division. He was in command of its 81 mm mortar platoon.

Lt. Littell safely made the jump into Normandy in the early hours of D-Day, June 6, 1944. He lost his cricket toy which the men click-clacked to identify each other and he was almost shot by a private in his platoon. His luck did not last the day. He died of wounds after being hit by multiple fragments when a German artillery shell exploded near him.

His grave is at Christ Church Cemetery in South Amboy, New Jersey.

Thank you Howard for your sacrifice. Let's Earn It for Howard.


On behalf of the fallen, if you would like to see more people become aware of this project to honor the WW2 fallen, be sure to share with others on Twitter, Facebook, etc. Thanks for your interest!

To mark having over 100,000 visits to my project to honor the fallen of WW2 on their 100th birthdate, I created this video to share. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vXt8QA481lY


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Sunday, July 23, 2017

WW2 Fallen - James Elvington, 4th Marine Division

Pvt. James Elvington, Sr. landed on Iwo Jima with the 2nd Battalion, 23rd Marine Regiment marines in this photo.
https://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=pv&GRid=108415506&PIpi=108570219
http://fightingfourtharizona.com/images/azsemper/2ndBn-23rd.jpg 

James G. Elvington, Sr. never had a chance to reach 100 years old today. Instead, he sacrificed his life for our freedom.

He was born on July 23, 1917 in South Carolina. His father was also born in South Carolina while his mother was born in North Carolina. His father worked as a farmer and died in 1939. James had six older brothers, an older sister and three younger sisters. By 1940 James was married to his wife Geritlee and they had a one year old son - James Jr. Over the next few years they would add two more boys and a daughter. He worked as a salesman and later worked in a service station.

He enlisted in the US Marines on May 11, 1944. He was assigned as a replacement private to Company E, 2nd Battalion, 23rd Marine Regiment, 4th Marine Division.

The 4th Marine Division took part in the battles of Kwajalein, Saipan, and Tinian before its final battle on Iwo Jima. I don't know if Pvt. Elivington was with the 2/23 before Iwo Jima.

The battle began on February 19, 1945. Pvt. Elvington would have landed with the first wave. His regiment's mission was to capture Airfield #1 the Airfield #2. Within two days the 4th Marines had suffered 32% casualties but still managed to be in control of both airfields by February 22. The tenacious defenders continued to inflict horrific casualties day after day (or at night from regular Banzai attacks). By March 3, the 4th Marines were under 50% combat efficiency. On D+15: March 6, the 4th Marines was still on the attack, though on this day the average daily advance was only 200 yards. Pvt. Elvington died on this day.

His grave is at Greenlawn Memorial Park in Columbia South Carolina. His widow never remarried and died in 1981. His four children are quite possibly still living since they would be in their seventies.

Thank you James for your sacrifice. Let's Earn It for James.


On behalf of the fallen, if you would like to see more people become aware of this project to honor the WW2 fallen, be sure to share with others on Twitter, Facebook, etc. Thanks for your interest!

To mark having over 100,000 visits to my project to honor the fallen of WW2 on their 100th birthdate, I created this video to share. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vXt8QA481lY


Follow on Twitter @ww2fallen100
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Saturday, July 22, 2017

WW2 Fallen - Captain Samuel Ogden, 82nd Airborne Division

Captain Samuel Ogden commanded the 3rd Battalion of the 325th Infantry Regiment during the Battle of the Bulge.
https://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=77253696&ref=acom
12524123_1642614736061836_7934452426248479523_n.png 
Samuel Lapsley Ogden never had a chance to reach 100 years old today. Instead, he sacrificed his life for our freedom.

He was born on July 22, 1917 in Tennessee. His father was also born in Tennessee while his mother was born in Alabama. His father worked as a school teacher and later as an agronomist. Samuel had a younger sister and a younger brother. By 1940 Samuel had completed four years of college at the University of Tennessee and was a reserve army officer living in New York.

He accepted a commission in the regular army on March 16, 1940. He was probably an officer in the 401st Glider Infantry Regiment, 101st Airborne Infantry Division while it was still stateside. At some point he joined the 82nd Airborne Infantry Division. He ended up as a captain in command of the 3rd Battalion in the 325th Glider Infantry Regiment.

Captain Ogden fought in Salerno, Normandy, Operation Market Garden, and the Battle of the Bulge.

The 82nd was rushed to Werbomont, Belgium on December 18, 2017 to halt the German breakthrough during the Battle of the Bulge. It successfully held it's position again repeated attacks from two German divisions. By early January, the 82nd was retaking lost ground. On January 2, 1945 the 325th came under intense artillery fire. Captain Ogden died the next day near Fontainebleu, Belgium.

His grave is at Berry Highland Memorial Cemetery in Knoxville, Tennessee.

Thank you Samuel for your sacrifice. Let's Earn It for Samuel.


On behalf of the fallen, if you would like to see more people become aware of this project to honor the WW2 fallen, be sure to share with others on Twitter, Facebook, etc. Thanks for your interest!

To mark having over 100,000 visits to my project to honor the fallen of WW2 on their 100th birthdate, I created this video to share. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vXt8QA481lY


Follow on Twitter @ww2fallen100
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Friday, July 21, 2017

WW2 Fallen - Bataan Death March Survivor Paul Basinger

Pvt. Paul Basinger survived the Bataan Death March, but died two months later while a POW.
http://www.cleveland.com/metro/index.ssf/2017/04/bataan_death_march_75_years_ago.html 

Paul Rex Basinger never had a chance to reach 100 years old today. Instead, he sacrificed his life for our freedom.

He was born on July 21, 1917 in Texas. His parents were also both born in Texas. By 1920 his mother was living with her widowed mother and her brother, a cotton farmer. They were back living with his father in 1930. His father worked as a machinist and later a mechanic. Paul had a younger sister. By 1940 Paul had completed four years of high school and worked as a plumber while still living at home with his parents.

He enlisted in the Army Air Corps on May 31, 1941. He was sent to the Philippines and was a private in the 7th Material Squadron. His job was to provide supplies and maintenance for the B-17s at Clark Field. When the planes were destroyed on the first day of the war, the 200 men in Pvt. Basinger's unit were issued WWI Springfield rifles and sent to help defend Bataan, despite having no infantry training. Bataan surrendered on April 9, 1942. Pvt. Basinger survived the 60 mile Bataan Death March, but he did not survive long as a prisoner of war. He died on June 10, 1942.

His grave is at Grove Hill Memorial Park in Dallas, Texas.

Thank you Paul for your sacrifice. Let's Earn It for Paul.


On behalf of the fallen, if you would like to see more people become aware of this project to honor the WW2 fallen, be sure to share with others on Twitter, Facebook, etc. Thanks for your interest!

To mark having over 100,000 visits to my project to honor the fallen of WW2 on their 100th birthdate, I created this video to share. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vXt8QA481lY


Follow on Twitter @ww2fallen100
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Thursday, July 20, 2017

WW2 Fallen - Charles McCoy, 90th Infantry Division

Pvt. Charles McCoy was one of the 90th Infantry Division troops who cross the swollen Saar River in December 1944.
http://www.everytownusa.com/90th-infantry-division/90th-infantry-division-pic-of-the-week-saar-river-germany/ 
Charles C. McCoy never had a chance to reach 100 years old today. Instead, he sacrificed his life for our freedom.

He was born on July 20, 1917 in Illinois. His parents were also both born in Illinois. His father worked as a farmer. Charles had a younger brother and a younger sister. By 1940 Charles was still living at home, working on the family farm. He had completed eight years of schooling.

He married his wife Virginia Cruise and they had a boy born in 1941, another boy born either as a twin or one or two years later, and a girl born in 1944.

He enlisted in the army on January 5, 1944.  He was assigned to Company F, 2nd Battalion, 359th  Infantry Regiment, 90th Infantry Division where he held the rank of private.

The 359th Infantry Regiment landed on Utah Beach on D-Day. I don't know if Pvt. McCoy was with the unit at that time. Most likely, he joined later as a replacement since he was from Illinois and the unit originated in Texas and Oklahoma.

The division cross the Saar River on December 6, 1944 and establishing a bridgehead north of present-day Saarlouis. The bridgehead was tenuous. The Germans would not allow a bridge over the river so the troops on the east bank had to be supplied by boats during the nights. The Americans had no armor while the Germans did. They were on defense as the Germans unsuccessfully tried to push the Americans back into the river. Pvt. McCoy died in the midst of this battle, on December 10, 1944. Ten days after his death, the 90th pulled back across the Saar so it could counterattack German units that had overrun American positions during the early days of the Battle of the Bulge.

His grave is at the Calvary Cemetery in Brimfield, Illinois. His daughter died in 2010, his oldest son died in 2013, and his widow, who remarried, died in 2014.

Thank you Charles for your sacrifice. Let's Earn It for Charles.


On behalf of the fallen, if you would like to see more people become aware of this project to honor the WW2 fallen, be sure to share with others on Twitter, Facebook, etc. Thanks for your interest!

To mark having over 100,000 visits to my project to honor the fallen of WW2 on their 100th birthdate, I created this video to share. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vXt8QA481lY


Follow on Twitter @ww2fallen100
Join the public Facebook group WW2 Fallen 100