Sunday, December 31, 2017

WW2 Fallen - B-24 pilot Hubert Chamness

Lt. Hubert Chamness piloted the B-24 Flak Happy based in Italy.
https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/68678013
http://www.454thbombgroup.it/739thdef.htm 
Hubert Ray Chamness never had a chance to reach 100 years old on New Year's Day. Instead, he sacrificed his life for our freedom.

He was born on January 1, 1918 in California. His father John was also born in California and his mother May was born in Kansas. His father worked as a dairy assistant manager and later as creamery manager. Hubert had two older sisters and one older brother. By 1940 Hubert had completed four years of high school and he was working as a milk salesman while living with his sister and her husband.

I don't know when Hubert enlisted but he volunteered for the Army Air Forces and became a pilot and second lieutenant in the 739th Bombardment Squadron, 454th Bombardment Group, 15th Air Force which was equipped with B-24 Liberators. The 454 BG was activated in June 1943 and arrived in Italy in January 1944.

On November 11, 1944 Lt. Chamness was piloting the B-24 Flak Happy on a mission to Linz, Austria. It did not make it back to base and was reported missing. Later it was determined that Lt. Chamness was killed, but all of the rest of the crew survived.

Updated 1/2/2018: Thanks to Joe Irvine who provided me with this photo of Lt. Chamness and the crew of Flak Happy.

https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=10155793890072279&set=p.10155793890072279&type=3&theater&ifg=1
His grave is at Long Beach Municipal Cemetery in California.

Thank you Hubert for your sacrifice. Let's Earn It for Hubert.

Stanly Berdinsky, 103rd Infantry Division, was the first of the fallen that I profiled one year ago on New Year's Day. You can read his story here.

On behalf of the fallen, if you would like to see more people become aware of this project to honor the WW2 fallen, be sure to share with others on Twitter, Facebook, etc. Thanks for your interest!

I created this video to explain why I started this project: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vXt8QA481lY.

Follow on Twitter @ww2fallen100
Join the public Facebook group WW2 Fallen 100

WW2 Fallen - Herman "Bing" Bang, 44th Infantry Division

Sgt. Bing Bang served in the 44th Infantry Division until near the end of the war in Europe.
https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/23920408
http://gjsims.com/dadsty.htm
The WW2 Fallen 100 project is ending the year with a Bang!

Herman O. "Bing" Bang never had a chance to reach 100 years old today. Instead, he sacrificed his life for our freedom.

He was born on December 31, 1917 in North Dakota. His mother Maria was also born in North Dakota and his father Olaf was from Norway. His father worked as a farmer. Herman had three older brothers, two older sisters and a younger sister. By 1940 Herman had already joined the army and was stationed in Grand Rapids, North Dakota.

He became a staff sergeant in Company I, 3rd Battalion, 324th Infantry Regiment, 44th Infantry Division. The 44th ID was stateside from February 1942 to August 1944 when it was sent to France. It was assigned to the 7th Army and fought in the Vosges Mountains beginning in October. It cross the Rhine in late March 1945 and captured Mannheim.

On April 9 the assignment for the 324th IR was to continue advancing south of Bad Mergentheim. Company I ran into stiff resistance from SS troops in Adolzhausen. Sgt. Bang was likely wounded at that time and died the next day.

His grave is at Ness Lutheran Church Cemetery in Mekinock, North Dakota.

Thank you Herman for your sacrifice. Let's Earn It for Herman.

On behalf of the fallen, if you would like to see more people become aware of this project to honor the WW2 fallen, be sure to share with others on Twitter, Facebook, etc. Thanks for your interest!

I created this video to explain why I started this project: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vXt8QA481lY.

Follow on Twitter @ww2fallen100
Join the public Facebook group WW2 Fallen 100

Saturday, December 30, 2017

WW2 Fallen - F4U-1 Corsair pilot and Annapolis grad Alvin Blackman

Lt. Alvin Blackman and F4U-1 Corsair pilot was killed in a stateside crash.
https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/2617145
http://ww2.wwarii.com/wwii-equipment/wwii-aircraft/allied_aircraft/american_aircraft/F4U-Corsair/F4U-1-Corsair-in-flight-near-Naval-Air-Station-NAS-Norfolk-Virginia-on-September-29-1942 
Alvin Demaine Blackman never had a chance to reach 100 years old today. Instead, he sacrificed his life for our freedom.

He was born on December 30, 1917 in California. His father Leon was also born in California and his mother Virginia was born in Ohio. His father worked as an electrical engineer. Alvin had an older sister. By 1940 Alvin was attending the United States Naval Academy where he was on the swim team and sailing team. He graduated in 1941.

I don't know what his service was during the early part of the war, but he became a fighter pilot and a lieutenant. On October 26, 1944 Lt. Blackman was flying a F4U-1 Corsair and died when it crashed near Coyle Airfield, New Jersey.

His grave is at Long Island National Cemetery in East Farmingdale, New York.

Thank you Alvin for your sacrifice. Let's Earn It for Alvin.

Thanks to Darillyn Lamb Starr for recommending that Alvin be profiled.


On behalf of the fallen, if you would like to see more people become aware of this project to honor the WW2 fallen, be sure to share with others on Twitter, Facebook, etc. Thanks for your interest!

I created this video to explain why I started this project: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vXt8QA481lY.

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Join the public Facebook group WW2 Fallen 100

Friday, December 29, 2017

WW2 Fallen - C-46 copilot Herbert Evans, home after MIA for 57 years

Lt. Hebert Evans was C-46 copilot flying over the "hump" from India to China.
https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/15158195
https://www.pinterest.com/pin/517491813410246748/?lp=true
Herbert William Evans never had a chance to reach 100 years old today. Instead, he sacrificed his life for our freedom.

He was born on December 29, 1917 in South Dakota. His mother was born in Minnesota and his father was born in Maryland. Herbert had an older brother and an older sister. He graduated from the University of South Dakota in 1939 and worked at a radio station and newspaper.

He enlisted in the Army Air Forces on March 10, 1943. He became a copilot and first lieutenant in the 930th Ferrying Squadron, India-China Wing, Air Transport Command, 10th Air Force where he flew C-46 Commando transports. (The 930th Ferrying Squad is an error because it did not exist. I am not sure what his actual ferrying squad was.) Lt. Evans flew missions that brought supplies from India to China by flying over the Himalayan Mountains. 

On March 27, 1944 Lt. Evans and three other airmen took off in their C-46 from an airfield in Kunming, China. As the plane reached the Himalayan Mountains, the radio operator sent a request for bearings. The plane never finished it's flight and it's fate remained unknown until after the war. The crash site was identified in 1946, but no effort was made to retrieve the remains at the time. Once the Communists took control of China that was not a viable option. 

Mrs. Evans ordered a headstone for a cenotaph grave in 1960. In 2001 his remains were finally returned from China and he was finally buried next to his parents. His then 96 year old sister was still alive at the time.

His grave is at Black Hills National Cemetery in Sturgis, South Dakota.

Thank you Herbert for your sacrifice. Let's Earn It for Herbert.

On behalf of the fallen, if you would like to see more people become aware of this project to honor the WW2 fallen, be sure to share with others on Twitter, Facebook, etc. Thanks for your interest!

I created this video to explain why I started this project: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vXt8QA481lY.

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Join the public Facebook group WW2 Fallen 100

Thursday, December 28, 2017

WW2 Saipan Fallen - Perry McElreath, 4th Marine Division

Sgt. McElreath was killed in action on Saipan where this photo was taken.
https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/65000267
http://www.flyingtigerantiques.com/mm5/merchant.mvc?Screen=PROD&Store_Code=fta&Product_Code=mcpa20004a&Category_Code=05mcpa
https://www.ibiblio.org/hyperwar/USMC/USMC-C-Saipan/index.html 
Perry D. McElreath never had a chance to reach 100 years old today. Instead, he sacrificed his life for our freedom.

He was born on December 28, 1917 in Texas. His parents were also both born in Texas. His father worked as a farmer and died in 1925. Perry had two older sister and four older brothers. By 1940 Perry had completed four years of high school and was living with his widowed mother. 

He enlisted in the US Marines in October 1941 and became a sergeant in Company E, 2nd Battalion, 20th Marine Regiment, 4th Marine Division. The 4th MD was formally activated in August 1943. It saw action for the first time in Kwajalein in January 1944. It next participated in the Battle of Saipan which lasted from June 15 to July 9, 1944. 

On the last day of the battle, the 4th MD advanced to Marpi Point, at the northern tip of the island. An officer in Sgt. McElreath's unit wrote:

During this day as we moved along the cliffs and caves, we uncovered civilians all the time. The Jap soldiers would not surrender, and would not permit the civilians to surrender. I saw with my own eyes women, some carrying children, come out of the caves and start toward our lines. They'd be shot down by their own people. I watched any number of women carrying children come down to the cliffs that dropped to the ocean.

They were very steep, very precipitous. The women would come down and throw the children into the ocean and jump in and commit suicide. I watched one group at a distance of perhaps 100 yards, about eight or ten civilian men, women and children get into a little huddle and blow themselves up. . . . It was a sad and terrible thing, and yet I presume quite consistent with the Japanese rules of Bushido.

The Americans lost 3,426 men during those 24 days and the 4th Marines lost 27 percent of its strength to casualties. Sgt. McElreath died on the last day of the battle, perhaps in the act of trying to stop the Japanese civilians from killing themselves. 

His grave is at Edith Ford Memorial Cemeteries in Canadian, Texas.

Updated 12.30.2017: Thanks to Joe Irvine who found this picture of Perry McElreath.

http://yellowfootprints.com/forums/showthread.php?t=16385
Thank you Perry for your sacrifice. Let's Earn It for Perry.

On behalf of the fallen, if you would like to see more people become aware of this project to honor the WW2 fallen, be sure to share with others on Twitter, Facebook, etc. Thanks for your interest!

I created this video to explain why I started this project: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vXt8QA481lY.

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Join the public Facebook group WW2 Fallen 100

Wednesday, December 27, 2017

WW2 Fallen - B-17 tail gunner Vern Barnett

Lt. Vern Barnett was the tail gunner of 366th Bomb Squadron B-17 on his final mission.
https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/12930064/vern-francis-barnett/photo
https://www.worldwarphotos.info/gallery/usa/aircrafts-2-3/b-17/b-17-305-bomb-group-366-bomb-squadron/ 
Vern Francis Barnett never had a chance to reach 100 years old today. Instead, he sacrificed his life for our freedom.

He was born on December 27, 1917 in Utah. His father Eli was also born in Utah and his mother Minnie was born in Nebraska. His father worked as a lumberyard wagon driver and later as a mine industry teamster. Still later he worked as a farmer. Vern had four older sisters, one younger brother (who served in the Navy in WW2), and two younger sisters. By 1940 Vern had completed four years of high school and was working as a rock mason.

He enlisted in the army on February 21, 1941. Seven months later Vern married Meredith Shepherd. He became a second lieutenant in the 366th Bombardment Squadron, 305th Bombardment Group which was equipped with B-17 Flying Fortresses. The 305 BG arrived in England in November 1942. Lt. Barnett likely joined his unit much later.

On February 25, 1944 Lt. Barnett was the tail gunner in Lt. Bob Safranek's B-17 on a bombing mission to Augsburg. It was part of an effort known as 'Big Week' when the 8th Air Force focused on dealing a heavy blow to the German air industry and depleting the German fighter squadrons. Over 3,000 sorties were executed in six days dropping 10,000 tons of bombs.

Lt. Barnett's plane was hit by flak north of Stuttgart. Seven airmen survived and became prisoners of war. Lt. Barnett and two others were killed. I don't know why Barnett, as a lieutenant, was acting as a gunner, which was an assignment given to sergeants. Lt Barnett's plane was one of the last of the 137 bombers lost by the 8th Air Force over six days. The Germans lost 355 fighter planes and 100 irreplaceable fighter pilots during 'Big Week'.

His (most likely cenotaph) grave is at Payson City Cemetery in Utah. His widow remarried and died in 1976.

Thank you Vern for your sacrifice. Let's Earn It for Vern.

On behalf of the fallen, if you would like to see more people become aware of this project to honor the WW2 fallen, be sure to share with others on Twitter, Facebook, etc. Thanks for your interest!

I created this video to explain why I started this project: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vXt8QA481lY.

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Join the public Facebook group WW2 Fallen 100

Tuesday, December 26, 2017

WW2 Fallen - Eber Boden, Bataan Death March survivor and POW

Sgt. Eber Boden survived the Bataan Death March only to die as a POW.
https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/59570136
https://www.pinterest.com/pin/570901690244346722/ 
Eber L. Boden never had a chance to reach 100 years old today. Instead, he sacrificed his life for our freedom.

He was born on December 26, 1917 in Oklahoma. His mother Marguerita was born in Nebraska and his father Charles was born in Kansas. His father worked as a farmer. Eber had an older brother, five younger brothers, and a younger sister. By 1940 Eber, known as Eb to his family, had completed four years of high school and was working on the family farm. He enjoyed writing poetry.

He enlisted in the army on March 23, 1941. He was trained as a tank mechanic. He became a Tech 5 in Company D, 192nd Tank Battalion which was a National Guard unit that was federalized and sent to the Philippines, arriving on November 20, 1941. The men were given a Thanksgiving dinner upon arriving at Clark Field. They watched helplessly as a Japanese air attack on December 8, 1941 destroyed nearly all the planes parked on the field. For the next four months Sgt. Boden helped keep the tanks running in the doomed attempt to hold off the Japanese attacks on the Bataan Peninsula. 

After being captured, Sgt. Boden survived the Bataan Death March and ended up at Camp O'Donnell. With only one water source for 12,000 men, the camp lost up to 50 men per day from diseases. Sgt. Boden lasted until November. On the anniversary of his arrival in the Philippines, Sgt. Boden awoke with a fever. He lasted a couple of days before dying from pneumonia on November 22, 1942.

Four days later his family no doubt spent the first fourth-Thursday-of-November Thanksgiving, created by Congress the year before, praying and hoping for Eber's safe return. It was most likely not until December or perhaps much later that they received the telegram notifying them of Eber's death.

At least three of his six brothers served in the military: one in the Navy during World War 2, one in the Air Force in the Korean War, and one in Navy in the Vietnam War (and buried at sea in 1967).

His grave is at Oakwood Memorial Cemetery in Oakwood, Oklahoma.

Thank you Eber for your sacrifice. Let's Earn It for Eber.

On behalf of the fallen, if you would like to see more people become aware of this project to honor the WW2 fallen, be sure to share with others on Twitter, Facebook, etc. Thanks for your interest!

I created this video to explain why I started this project: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vXt8QA481lY.

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Join the public Facebook group WW2 Fallen 100

Sunday, December 24, 2017

WW2 Pearl Harbor Fallen - USNA grad Edward Cloues, USS Arizona

Ensign Edward Cloues was killed when the Japanese bombed the USS Arizona depicted in this paining by Tom Freeman.
https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/56117963
http://archives.starbulletin.com/2001/05/20/features/story5.html
Edward Blanchard Cloues never had a chance to reach 100 years old on Christmas Day. Instead, he sacrificed his life for our freedom.

He was born on December 25, 1917 in New Hampshire. His parents Alfred and Hattie were both born in Massachusetts. His father worked as a lumber mill manager and later as a postmaster. Still later he was the treasurer for Merrimack County. Edward had two younger brothers, the younger of which served in the army during World War 2. By 1940 Edward had graduated from the US Naval Academy.

Ensign Cloues was assigned to serve on the USS Arizona and arrived on station on June 29, 1940. On the first weekend of December 1941, Ensign Cloues had earned leave in Honolulu. He traded with another ensign and stayed onboard. As is well known, on December 7, 1941 Arizona was mortally struck by a devastating dive bombing attack when a Japanese bomb penetrated its deck and exploded the forward magazine. Ensign Cloues battle station was in one of the gun turrets. He was likely killed in the massive explosion since his body was never found. His family probably spent Christmas 1941, and Edward's birthday, with the unconfirmed knowledge that Edward would not be coming home.

The destroyer escort USS Cloues was named after him. It was christened by his mother on August 10, 1943.

USS Cloues
http://www.navsource.org/archives/06/images/265/0626505.jpg
Edward remains entombed in the USS Arizona. His name is listed on the Tablet of the Missing at the Honolulu Memorial.

Thank you Edward for your sacrifice. Let's Earn It for Edward and remember the blessing we now enjoyed in our free nation. Here, in part, is what President Truman said on December 24, 1945, the first Christmas season of peace after four years of war:

With our enemies vanquished we must gird ourselves for the work that lies ahead. Peace has its victories no less hard won than success at arms. We must not fail or falter. We must strive without ceasing to make real the prophecy of Isaiah: “They shall beat their swords into plowshares and their spears into pruning-hooks: nation shall not lift up sword against nation, neither shall they learn war any more.”

In this day, whether it be far or near, the Kingdoms of this world shall become indeed the Kingdom of God and He will reign forever and ever, Lord of Lords and King of Kings. With that message I wish my countrymen a Merry Christmas and joyous days in the New Year.


On behalf of the fallen, if you would like to see more people become aware of this project to honor the WW2 fallen, be sure to share with others on Twitter, Facebook, etc. Thanks for your interest!

I created this video to explain why I started this project: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vXt8QA481lY.

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Join the public Facebook group WW2 Fallen 100

WW2 Fallen - Willie Putty, 4th Infantry Division

Pfc. Willie Putty was killed while the 4th Infantry Division attacked the city of Cherbourg, France.
https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/17177054
http://ww2daybyday.blogspot.com/2013/06/the-battle-of-cherbourg-ends.html
Willie O. Putty never had a chance to reach 100 years old today. Instead, he sacrificed his life for our freedom.

He was born on December 24, 1917 in Tennessee. His parents Edgar and Mary were also both born in Tennessee. His father worked as a farmer. Willie had two older brothers, three older sisters, and two younger sisters. Willie completed a grammar school education and worked on the family farm before the war.

He enlisted in the army on October 15, 1942. He became a private first class in Company C, 1st Battalion, 8th Infantry Regiment, 4th Infantry Division (Nicknamed "Ivy Division"). 

The 4th ID landed on Utah Beach on D-Day. After securing the beachhead, the 4th ID pivoted north to capture the important port of Cherbourg. Pfc. Putty was killed on June 24, 1944 while his company was clearing bunkers and pillboxes. Cherbourg fell five days later. The 4th ID lost 800 killed from D-Day until the capture of Cherbourg.

His grave is at Gordonsville Cemetery in Tennessee. His headstone erroneously shows he served in the 47th Infantry Division which did not exist during World War 2.

Thank you Willie for your sacrifice. Let's Earn It for Willie.

On behalf of the fallen, if you would like to see more people become aware of this project to honor the WW2 fallen, be sure to share with others on Twitter, Facebook, etc. Thanks for your interest!

I created this video to explain why I started this project: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vXt8QA481lY.

Follow on Twitter @ww2fallen100
Join the public Facebook group WW2 Fallen 100

Saturday, December 23, 2017

WW2 Normandy Fallen - Louis Miori, 4th Infantry Division

Troops from the 4th Infantry Division approach Avranches where Sgt. Louis Miori was killed on August 1, 1944.
https://www.abmc.gov/multimedia/images/american-soldiers-avranches
http://histomil.com/viewtopic.php?f=338&t=3918&start=560
Louis Miori never had a chance to reach 100 years old today. Instead, he sacrificed his life for our freedom.

He was born on December 23, 1917 in Seattle. His parents Sarafina and Filima were both born in Italian speaking Austria. His father worked as a street laborer. He died in 1931. Louis had an older sister and two younger brothers.

He enlisted in the army in 1942. He became a staff sergeant in Company H, 3rd Battalion, 12th Infantry Regiment, 4th Infantry Division (Nicknamed "Ivy Division"). The 4th ID arrived in England in January 1944. Sgt. Miori landed on Utah Beach on D-Day. Over the next three weeks he fought through Normandy until the important port of Cherbourg was captured. He saw many comrades fall. The 4th ID had 5,450 casualties including 800 killed during this time.

In July Sgt. Miori fought through the hedgerows of Normandy as part of Operation Cobra. By the end of the month the 4th ID had reached Avranches. Sgt. Miori was killed the next day on August 1, 1944.

His grave is at Calvary Cemetery in Seattle, Washington.

Thank you Louis for your sacrifice. Let's Earn It for Louis.

On behalf of the fallen, if you would like to see more people become aware of this project to honor the WW2 fallen, be sure to share with others on Twitter, Facebook, etc. Thanks for your interest!

I created this video to explain why I started this project: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vXt8QA481lY.

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Join the public Facebook group WW2 Fallen 100

Friday, December 22, 2017

WW2 Fallen - Raymond Lund, 1st Infantry Division

Pfc. Raymond Lund served in Sicily with these 16th Infantry Regiment troops.
 https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/104552827/Raymond-E-Lund
http://www.16thinfassn.org/history/historical-galleries/world-war-ii/sicily/
Raymond E. Lund never had a chance to reach 100 years old today. Instead, he sacrificed his life for our freedom.

He was born on December 22, 1917 in Minnesota. His parents were also both born in Minnesota. Raymond had an older sister and brother (twins), three younger brothers and three younger sisters. Two brothers served in the army during World War 2. His youngest brother was in the navy after World War 2.

He enlisted in the army on April 5, 1942. He became a private first class in Company E, 2nd Battalion, 16th Infantry Regiment, 1st Infantry Division (Nicknamed "The Big Red One"). He may not have been with the 1st ID when it landed in North Africa in November 1942, but he was part of the invasion of Sicily on July 10, 1943. On July 29 the 16th Infantry Regiment captured the high ground west of the Cerami River. Pfc. Lund was killed in action that day.

His grave is at Saint Stanilaus Church Cemetery in Sobieski, Minnesota.

Thank you Raymond for your sacrifice. Let's Earn It for Raymond.

On behalf of the fallen, if you would like to see more people become aware of this project to honor the WW2 fallen, be sure to share with others on Twitter, Facebook, etc. Thanks for your interest!

I created this video to explain why I started this project: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vXt8QA481lY.

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Join the public Facebook group WW2 Fallen 100

Thursday, December 21, 2017

WW2 Fallen - Kenneth Bricker, 36th Infantry Division

Pfc. Kenneth Bricker landed at Salerno in September 1943 with the 36th Infantry Division
and was killed in action two months later.
https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/26235994
https://www.flickr.com/photos/thenationalguard/4101113562 
Kenneth R. Bricker never had a chance to reach 100 years old today. Instead, he sacrificed his life for our freedom.

He was born on December 21, 1917 in Illinois. His parents Jerry and Mary were both born in Ohio. His father worked as a farmer. Kenneth had two younger sisters and three younger brothers. His youngest brother served in the army during the Korean War. Kenneth completed a grammar school education and worked as a truck driver before the war.

He enlisted in the army on February 18, 1942. He became a private first class in Company A, 1st Battalion, 142nd Infantry Regiment, 36th Infantry Division (Nicknamed "Arrowhead"). The 36th ID first saw action in Italy at the Battle of Salerno in September 1943. In November it was assigned to capture Mount Maggiore, Mount Lungo, and the village of San Pietro in cold rainy weather with little food and inadequate winter gear. The Germans had the high ground and made effective use of artillery. As a result, the 142nd IR had 126 casualties during November including 20 killed. Pfc. Bricker was killed on November 30.

His grave is at Clay City Cemetery in Illinois.

Thank you Kenneth for your sacrifice. Let's Earn It for Kenneth.

On behalf of the fallen, if you would like to see more people become aware of this project to honor the WW2 fallen, be sure to share with others on Twitter, Facebook, etc. Thanks for your interest!

I created this video to explain why I started this project: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vXt8QA481lY.

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Wednesday, December 20, 2017

WW2 Monte Cassino Fallen - Clarence Armstrong, 34th Infantry Division

Lt. Clarence Armstrong served with these men from the 34th Infantry Regiment in the First Battle of Monte Cassino.
https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/33833752
https://www.pinterest.fr/pin/538672805412496034/ 
Clarence Allen Armstrong never had a chance to reach 100 years old today. Instead, he sacrificed his life for our freedom.

He was born on December 20, 1917 in Ohio. His parents Luther and Annis were also both born in Ohio. His father worked as a saw mill engineer and later as a railroad car inspector. Clarence had two older brother, three older sisters, one younger brother and three younger sisters. By 1940 Clarence had completed two years of college at Ohio State University and was working as a railroad brakeman. He was still living at home.

He enlisted in the army on February 4, 1942. He became a first lieutenant in Company B, 1st Battalion, 168th Infantry Regiment, 34th Infantry Division (Nicknamed "Red Bull").

The 34th ID first saw action in Algeria in November 1942. It landed at Salerno, Italy in September 1943. In January 1944 its position had advanced to the Bernhardt Line. I don't know when Lt. Armstrong joined his unit. The Red Bulls took significant casualties and was in constant need of replacements. Lieutenants had to be replaced on a more frequent basis than most troops.

On January 24, 1944 the Red Bulls crossed the Gari River and attacked Monastery Hill, a target that would not fall cheaply during the effort to take Monte Cassino. Lt. Armstrong died of wounds on this first day of the attack. Overall the 34th ID's infantry battalions would sustain 80% casualties over the next three weeks.

The allies would suffer more than 55,000 casualties before Monte Cassino was finally taken four months later.

His grave is at King Cemetery in Middle Point, Ohio.

Thank you Clarence for your sacrifice. Let's Earn It for Clarence.

On behalf of the fallen, if you would like to see more people become aware of this project to honor the WW2 fallen, be sure to share with others on Twitter, Facebook, etc. Thanks for your interest!

I created this video to explain why I started this project: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vXt8QA481lY.

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Join the public Facebook group WW2 Fallen 100

Tuesday, December 19, 2017

WW2 Fallen - Silver Star hero William Podkulski, 101st Airborne Division

Pfc. William Podkulski was killed the day after this photo of another 101st airborne solider
was taken on September 17, 1944.
http://warfarehistorynetwork.com/daily/wwii/a-101st-airborne-paratroopers-combat-journey/
William F. Podkulski never had a chance to reach 100 years old today. Instead, he sacrificed his life for our freedom.

He was born on December 19, 1917, probably in Pennsylvania. His father Joseph was born in Poland. His father worked as a mine laborer and died in 1931 from blood poisoning. I was not able to find any information about his mother Josephine or about any siblings.

He enlisted in the army on August 2, 1939. He was a private first class in Company E, 2nd Battalion, 502nd Parachute Infantry Regiment, 101st Infantry Division. He parachuted into Normandy in the early hours of D-Day. A friend of his remembered William had to push the man in front of him out of the plane because he sat in the doorway and refused to jump.

Pvt. Podkulski next parachuted into Holland as part of Operation Market Garden on September 17, 1944. He was killed in action the next day. Prior to his death that day he took action that was recognized by a posthumous Sliver Star.

On 18 September 1944, in the vicinity of Best Holland, PFC Podkulski located an enemy mortar which was holding up the advance of his company. Searing personal safety, Private Podkulski rushed forward across an open field in the face of heavy and intense enemy fire to destroy the enemy gun. Before reaching the gun, he was seriously wounded. Undaunted and with unflinching devotion to duty he crawled forward to a position from which he was able to destroy the entire enemy position with hand grenades. By his heroic actions the company was able to advance toward its objective. During a later action he was mortally wounded. The supreme sacrifice he made above and beyond the call of duty his intrepid courage and heroic devotion to duty exemplify the highest standards of the military service.

His grave is at Holy Mother of Sorrows Parish Cemetery in Dupont, Pennsylvania.

Thank you William for your sacrifice. Let's Earn It for William.

On behalf of the fallen, if you would like to see more people become aware of this project to honor the WW2 fallen, be sure to share with others on Twitter, Facebook, etc. Thanks for your interest!

I created this video to explain why I started this project: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vXt8QA481lY.

Follow on Twitter @ww2fallen100
Join the public Facebook group WW2 Fallen 100

Monday, December 18, 2017

WW2 Fallen - Adam Culp, 3rd Infantry Division

Pfc. Adam Culp was part of these 3rd Division troops embarking for the invasion of Sicily.
http://old.minford.k12.oh.us/mhs/history/Veterans/WWII/Killed/culp.html
http://www.usmilitariaforum.com/forums/index.php?/topic/215633-wwii-3rd-infantry-division-patches-italian-made-one/
http://abmc.nomadmobileguides.com/SicilyRome.php?page=narrative&id=cont-4114
Adam Culp never had a chance to reach 100 years old today. Instead, he sacrificed his life for our freedom.

He was born on December 18, 1917 in Ohio. His parents William and Artie were also both born in Ohio. His father worked as a farmer and later as a railroad shop laborer. Still later he worked as a blacksmith. Adam had three older sisters and a younger sister. By 1940 Adam was still living at home. He had completed 8 years of school and was working as a farm hand.

He enlisted in the army on February 28, 1941. He became a private first class in Company L, 3rd Battalion, 7th Infantry Regiment, 3rd Infantry Division. The 3rd ID landed in North Africa in November 1942 and it captured half of Morocco. It's next assignment was the invasion of Sicily.

On August 9, 1943 Pfc. Culp's unit was fighting on the north end of Sicily by the Brolo River as it advanced on Palermo. The men endured heavy enemy artillery fire, tank fire, and machine-gun fire. The troops even had to deal with a mistaken bombing from friendly planes. Pfc. Culp was one of 41 men killed in this action with another 78 wounded and 58 missing.

His grave is at White Gravel Cemetery, Minford, Ohio.

Thank you Adam for your sacrifice. Let's Earn It for Adam.

On behalf of the fallen, if you would like to see more people become aware of this project to honor the WW2 fallen, be sure to share with others on Twitter, Facebook, etc. Thanks for your interest!

I created this video to explain why I started this project: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vXt8QA481lY.

Follow on Twitter @ww2fallen100
Join the public Facebook group WW2 Fallen 100