Wednesday, April 26, 2017

WW2 Fallen - Charles Hedrick, Lost At Sea

Seaman Charles Hedrick was on the USS Jacob Jones when it was sunk by a German U-boat.
http://destroyerhistory.org/flushdeck/ussjacobjones/ 

Charles M. Hedrick never had a chance to reach 100 years old today. Instead, he sacrificed his life for our freedom.

He was born on April 26, 1917 in West Virginia. His parents were also both born in West Virginia. His father was a farm laborer and later a farmer. Charles had two younger sisters and four younger brothers. By 1940 Charles had completed four years of high school.

Charles became a Seaman 2nd Class serving on the USS Jacob Jones, a Wickes class destroyer built in 1918 that had a crew of 149 on it's final patrol.

When the war started, the Jacob Jones acted as convoy protection for ships travelling from Argentina to America and Europe. In February, it was reassigned to anti-submarine duty to find the German subs that were wrecking havoc along the Atlantic coast. Jacob Jones departed New York on the morning of February 27, 1942.  Later that day it searched for survivors from a tanker that had been torpedoed by the U-578.

http://destroyerhistory.org/flushdeck/ussjacobjones/

The next day, in the dark of the early hours, the U-578 surprised Jacob Jones and hit her with two torpedoes. At least 30 men survived the sinking, but many of these were killed when depth charges exploded as the ship dropped to the bottom of the sea. A patrol craft was only able to rescue 12 survivors. Seaman Hedrick was not one of them.

Seaman Hedrick is remembered with a cenotaph memorial at Wallace Memorial Cemetery in Clintonville, West Virginia.

Thank you Charles for your sacrifice. Let's Earn It for Charles.


On behalf of the fallen, if you would like to see more people become aware of this project to honor the WW2 fallen, be sure to share with others on Twitter, Facebook, etc. Thanks for your interest!

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Tuesday, April 25, 2017

WW2 Fallen - Stanley Bennett, 24th Infantry Division

Pvt. Stanley Bennett.
from the book World War II Young American Patriots 1941-1945

Stanley W. Bennett never had a chance to reach 100 years old today. Instead, he sacrificed his life for our freedom.

He was born on April 25, 1917 in West Virginia. His parents were also both born in West Virginia. His father was a coal miner. Stanley had two older brothers, three younger brothers and two younger sisters. By 1940 Stanley had moved to Pennsylvania. He had a wife named Virginia and had a 4 year old girl and 2 year old boy, also named Stanley. A third child was born after the 1940 census. He had an 8th grade education and was working as a laborer.

Stanley entered the service on June 8, 1944 and became a private in Company K, 3rd Battalion, 34th Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division. Pvt. Bennett was likely a replacement soldier since the 34th IR was already in the South Pacific when he joined the army. 

He was no doubt already part of Company K when it took part in the invasion of Leyte in October 1944. By January 1945 it was on to the task of retaking Luzon. The 3rd Battalion was given the specific assignment of eliminating the Japanese on Corregidor Island. With the aid of paratroopers who dropped in on the high ground, the 3rd Bn landed on February 16 and found the island to be well defended. 

This map shows the attack on Corregidor that Pvt. Bennett participated in.
http://warfarehistorynetwork.com/daily/wwii/rock-force-assault-macarthurs-invasion-of-corregidor/ 

It took 11 days to dislodge the 6,700 Japanese defenders, 6.600 of which were killed. The Japanese conducted repeated banzai attacks. Pvt. Bennett was killed on February 17, the second day of the battle. He was one of 207 troops that were lost retaking Corregidor. 

His remains were returned to be buried at Grafton National Cemetery in Grafton, West Virginia.

Thank you Stanley for your sacrifice. Let's Earn It for Stanley.


On behalf of the fallen, if you would like to see more people become aware of this project to honor the WW2 fallen, be sure to share with others on Twitter, Facebook, etc. Thanks for your interest!

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Monday, April 24, 2017

WW2 Fallen - James Burnett, 29th Infantry Division

Pvt. James Burnett
https://116thregimentrollofhonor.blogspot.com/2016/09/pfc-james-earley-burnett.html#comment-form 

James E. Burnett never had a chance to reach 100 years old today. Instead, he sacrificed his life for our freedom.

He was born on April 24, 1917 in Virginia. His parents were also both born in Virginia. His father was a farmer. James had three younger sisters and four younger brothers. By 1940 he had completed a 6th grade level of school and worked as a farm laborer.

James enlisted in the army on April 14, 1941. He became a private in the Headquarter's Company, 2nd Battalion, 116th Infantry Regiment, 29th Infantry Division, nicknamed "The Blue and Gray."

Pvt. Burnett would have participated in the D-Day landing at Omaha Beach where the troops of the 116th Infantry Regiment were the first men on the beach. He would have been involved in the battle for St. Lo and the Normandy hedgerows. Pvt. Burnett was one of the more fortunate G.I.s by the end of the Normandy Campaign. The 29th Infantry Division in Normandy suffered more than 2,500 dead and 8,000 wounded. His luck did not hold out. His unit was next ordered to assault Brest. This lasted from August 25 to September 18. Pvt. Burnett died on September 4, 1944, one of four Blue and Gray men who died that day and one of 624 who lost their lives in the battle for Brest. 

His remains were returned to be buried at White Rock Cemetery in Floyd,Virginia.

Thank you James for your sacrifice. Let's Earn It for James.


On behalf of the fallen, if you would like to see more people become aware of this project to honor the WW2 fallen, be sure to share with others on Twitter, Facebook, etc. Thanks for your interest!

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Sunday, April 23, 2017

WW2 Fallen - Harold Nussman, P-47 Pilot

Lt. Haorld Nussman posses next to a previous P-47 he flew.
http://hjmarseille.tumblr.com/page/2

Harold C. Nussman never had a chance to reach 100 years old today. Instead, he sacrificed his life for our freedom.

He was born on April 23, 1917 in North Carolina. His parents were also both born in North Carolina. His father was a brick burner manager and later a carpenter. Harold had an older brother and an older sister, plus a younger brother and a younger sister. By 1940 he had completed high school and was working as a motor vehicle mechanic.

He was still living at home with his parents when he decided to enlist in the Army Air Corps on July 28, 1941 as a private. Over the next few years he advanced in ranks to 1st lieutenant. He was in the 328th Fighter Squadron, 352nd Fighter Group, 8th Air Force and flew P-47 Thunderbolts.

On February 8, 1944 Lt. Nussman was flying his P-47 Blondie  with four other P-47s in escort of a disabled B-17 returning from a mission to Frankfurt when four German FW-190s surprised them from out of the sun. His plane, and three others, were shot down and crashed near ChaCharlesville-Mezieres in France. Lt. Nussman and the other three P-47 pilots were all killed.

His remains were returned to be buried at Salisbury National Cemetery in North Carolina.

Thank you Harold for your sacrifice. Let's Earn It for Harold.


On behalf of the fallen, if you would like to see more people become aware of this project to honor the WW2 fallen, be sure to share with others on Twitter, Facebook, etc. Thanks for your interest!

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Saturday, April 22, 2017

WW2 Fallen - Lester Purcell, Americal Division

Troops from 132nd Infantry Regiment on Mt. Austen where Pvt. Purcell was killed attacking Japanese.
https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/f/f0/Woundet_Soldier_at_Guadalcanal.jpg
Lester W. Purcell never had a chance to reach 100 years old today. Instead, he sacrificed his life for our freedom.

He was born on April 22, 1917 in Illinois. His parents were also both born in Illinois. His father was a farmer who also worked as a garage mechanic. Lester had an older sister and one younger brother. 

By 1941 Lester had completed one year of high school and was working as a farm hand. Lester enlisted in the army on April 25, 1941.

He was a private in the 132nd Infantry Regiment, Americal Division. This was one of the first army regiments sent overseas. It left New York in January 1942 and arrived in Australia by February. By May it was attached to the Americal Division in New Caledonia which was assigned to augment and then relieve the 1st Marine Division on Guadalcanal.

Pvt. Purcell and the 132nd Infantry Regiment landed on Guadalcanal on December 8, 1942. By the second week on island the 132nd was ordered to drive the Japanese off of Mt. Austen. This hill was high ground that allowed the Japanese to keep an eye on Henderson Field. The Japanese position was their strongest on the island and it took more than a month to clear them off the hill. Pvt. Purcell was killed on December 27, 1942 when the Americans unsuccessfully combined a frontal assault with a flanking maneuver. He was one of 250 troops killed taking Mt. Austen.

His remains were returned to be buried at the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific.

Thank you Lester for your sacrifice. Let's Earn It for Lester.


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Friday, April 21, 2017

WW2 Fallen - Stephen Monson, 8th Air Force

Lt. Monson (third from left) is standing with the officers of his B-17 crew.
https://www.fold3.com/document/32148491/ 

Stephen M. Monson never had a chance to be 100 years old today. Instead, he lost his life in the service of his country during World War 2.

He was born on April 21, 1917 in Utah. His parents were also both born in Utah. His father was an oil company laborer and later a sheep herder. Stephen had three younger brothers. By 1940 Stephen had completed four years of high school and was working as a filing clerk.

Stephen enlisted in the Army Air Corps on January 23, 1942 as an aviation cadet.

He was a second lieutenant in the 323rd Bombardment Squadron, 91st Bombardment Group, 8th Air Force where he had the position of bombardier. 

On September 6, 1943, Lt. Monson's B-17 ditched in the English Channel after running out of gas on the return flight from it's bombing mission. Three crewmen died but Lt. Monson and seven other were rescued to return to duty.

On October 4, 1943 Lt. Monson was not so lucky. He was part of a mission with five planes from his squadron to bomb Frankfurt, Germany. Two planes aborted and two planes returned, but Lt. Monson's plane crash landed in Belgium. The nine other crewmen were captured by the Germans, but Lt. Monson was killed.

His remains were returned to be buried at the American Fork City Cemetery.

Thank you Stephen for your sacrifice. Let's Earn It for Stephen.


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Thursday, April 20, 2017

WW2 Fallen - William Hammack, B-17 Crewman

Sgt. William Hammack was an engineer on B-17s in the 26th Bomb Squadron such as these.
http://www.worldwarphotos.info/gallery/usa/aircrafts-2-3/b-17-flying-fortress/b-17f-of-the-26th-bs-11th-bg-enroute-to-raid-on-buka-airfield/ 

William L. Hammack could have been 100 years old today. 

He was born on April 20, 1917 in Indiana. His parents were also both born in Indiana. His father was a farmer and later a bus driver. William had two younger brothers and two younger sisters.

William became a sergeant in the Army Air Corp. He was part of a B-17 crew in the 26th Bombardment Squadron, 11th Bombardment Group.

On August 4, 1942 Sgt. Hammack was the engineer on a B-17 that took off from Espiritu Santo on a bombing mission against Tulagi in support of the Guadalcanal invasion. Japanese fighters intercepted the B-17s. One damaged Japanese fighter collided with Sgt. Hammack's bomber sending both planes crashing into the sea below. There were no survivors. This was the first US plane lost in the Guadalcanal campaign.

Sgt. Hammack is memorialized at Deer Creek Baptist Church Cemetery, Tell City, Indiana. The year after his death, his father died at age 50.

Thank you William for your sacrifice. Let's Earn It for William.


On behalf of the fallen, if you would like to see more people become aware of this project to honor the WW2 fallen, be sure to share with others on Twitter, Facebook, etc. Thanks for your interest!

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Wednesday, April 19, 2017

WW2 Fallen - Carlton Carney, 4th Infantry Division

Lt. Carlton Carney, 4th Infantry Division, landed on Utah Beach on D-Day.
https://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=30752069 

Carlton Eugene Carney could have been 100 years old today. 

He was born on April 19, 1917 in North Carolina. His parents were also both born in the Tar Heel State. His father was a railroad conductor. Carlton had two older sisters and three younger sisters. 

By 1940 Carlton had completed four years of high school and was working as a bookkeeping machine operator. He enlisted as a private in the army on September 16, 1940. 

Over the years of the war Pvt. Carney rose to the rank of 2nd lieutenant in Company M, 8th Infantry Regiment, 4th Infantry Division. While in the service he married Doris Smith Carney.

Excluding the paratroopers who jumped in during the early hours of June 6, 1944, the 8th Infantry Regiment troops landing at Utah Beach were the first American infantry to set foot in France on D-Day. During the fighting to clear the Cotentin Peninsula over the next few days and weeks, Lt. Carney was captured by the Germans. The details are unknown, but while a POW, Lt. Carney was killed on June 22, 1944.

His remains were returned to be buried at Wilmington National Cemetery. I don't know what happened to Carlton's widow.

Thank you Carlton for your sacrifice. Let's Earn It for Carlton.


On behalf of the fallen, if you would like to see more people become aware of this project to honor the WW2 fallen, be sure to share with others on Twitter, Facebook, etc. Thanks for your interest!

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Tuesday, April 18, 2017

WW2 Fallen - Henry Pollreis

Henry Pollreis prior to enlisting in Coast Artillery.
Photo shared with ancestry.com

Henry G. Pollreis could have been 100 years old today. 

He was born on April 18, 1917 in Colorado. His parents were both born in Austria. His father was a farmer. Henry had two older sisters and one older brother. By 1940 Henry's mother had passed away.

On November 12, 1941, Henry, who was living in Montana, traveled to Fort Lewis, Washington and enlisted in the army. Prior to enlisting he had completed one year of high school and was working as a farm hand. Over the next year he rose to the rank of corporal.

His army internment records identify he served in the 707th Coast Artillery AA Battery. There is little information about this unit. I found one other serviceman from this unit that died during the war. One source place his November 26, 1942 death in New Guinea. Whether his death was related to combat, accident, or illness is unknown.

His remains were returned to be buried at Ft. McPherson National Cemetery in Nebraska.

Thank you Henry for your sacrifice. Let's Earn It for Henry.


On behalf of the fallen, if you would like to see more people become aware of this project to honor the WW2 fallen, be sure to share with others on Twitter, Facebook, etc. Thanks for your interest!

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Monday, April 17, 2017

WW2 Fallen - Submariner Fraser Knight, USS Bonefish

Lt. Cdr. Fraser Knight served on the USS Bonefish's final patrol.
https://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=56113220

Fraser Sinclair Knight could have been 100 years old today. 

He was born on April 17, 1917 in Florida. I was unable to find any background on his family.

Fraser was assigned to surface vessels of the Navy in 1939 after graduating from the US Naval Academy that same year. In 1941 he transferred to submarine duty where he served until his final patrol on the USS Bonefish as one of it's senior officers with the rank of lieutenant commander.

USS Bonefish
http://www.submarinesailor.com/Boats/SS223Bonefish/Patrol4Crew.htm

The Bonefish began it's final patrol on May 28, 1945. It sunk a Japanese transport and and a freighter in the Sea of Japan. When it did not return, it was classified as lost at sea. After the war, Japanese war records showed that a submarine destroyed by depth charges on June 19 was no doubt the Bonefish. The full crew of 85, including Lt. Cdr. Knight were lost.

Lt. Cdr. Knight's sacrifice is honored at the Honolulu Memorial.

Thank you Fraser for your sacrifice. Let's Earn It for Fraser.

Thanks to Darillyn Lamb Starr for recommending that Thomas be profiled.


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WW2 Fallen - Donald Garten, 38th Infantry Division

151st Infantry Regiment in action on Caraboa Island the month before Pvt. Garten was killed.
http://www.ww2online.org/image/company-1st-battalion-151st-infantry-carabao-island-philippines-16-april-1945

Donald F. Garten could have been 100 years old today. 

He was born on April 17, 1917 in Indiana. His father was also born in Indiana and his mother was born in Illinois. His father was a master woodworker. Donald had one older brother, plus a younger brother and sister. By 1930 the Great Depression hit the Gartens especially hard. His father was unemployed and Donald was sent to the St. Vincents Orphanage in Vincennes, Indiana, 

Donald joined the Indiana National Guard on January 17, 1941. Prior to that he had completed three years of high school and was working as a clerk. After the war started Donald became a private in Company M, 151st Infantry Regiment, 38th Infantry Division.

The 38th Division landed and fought in Leyte in December 1944 and then Luzon in January 1945. It cleared the Japanese out of the Bataan Peninsula and Corregidor Island in February. By late May the Japanese had for the most part been eradicated in and around Manila. However, Pvt. Garten was killed by a hold-out Japanese sniper near Manila on May 22, 1945.

His remains were returned to be buried at Arlington National Cemetery.

https://cs.billiongraves.com/grave/Donald-F-Garten/12140490

Thank you Donald for your sacrifice. Let's Earn It for Donald.


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Sunday, April 16, 2017

WW2 Fallen - Ray Backus, 4th Marine Division, Iwo Jima

Pvt. Backus served with these marines from the 23rd Marine Regiment on Iwo Jima.
https://www.milsurps.com/showthread.php?t=18884 

Ray E. Backus could have been 100 years old today. 

He was born on April 16, 1917 in Ohio. His parents were also both born in Ohio. His father was a timber cutter and later a coal miner. His mother had been previously married and had four daughters and three sons with her first husband. Ray had one older brother with the same father. 

Ray became a private in the 23rd Marine Regiment, 4th Marine Division. I don't know if he was with this unit when it participated in the battles of Kwajalein, Saipan, and Tinian. He was serving in the 23rd Marines in the Battle of Iwo Jima. It landed on Yellow Beach on February 19, 1945. Pvt. Backus and his fellow 23rd Marines were able to reach Airfield No. 1 by the end of the first day. A fellow Marine, Darrell S. Cole, died earning the Medal of Honor during this advance. Pvt. Backus endured nine more days of brutal fighting until he was killed on February 28, 1945 as the 23rd Marine Regiment cleared the Japanese away from Airfield No. 2 and Hill 382. 

This map shows were the 23rd Marine Regiment was when Pvt. Backus was killed on February 28, 1945.
https://www.ibiblio.org/hyperwar/USMC/USMC-M-IwoJima/USMC-M-IwoJima-8.html

Pvt. Backus was one of 6,821 Americans who died in the battle. Fighting continued until victory was declared on March 26, 1945.

His remains were returned to be buried at the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific.

Thank you Ray for your sacrifice. Let's Earn It for Ray.


On behalf of the fallen, if you would like to see more people become aware of this project to honor the WW2 fallen, be sure to share with others on Twitter, Facebook, etc. Thanks for your interest!

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Saturday, April 15, 2017

WW2 Fallen - Armando Gardea, 29th Infantry Division

The 115th Infantry Regiment advances through St. Lo a few weeks before Pvt. Gardea was killed.
http://www.matrixgames.com/forums/tm.asp?m=2627264&mpage=2&key=&#2918892 

Armando Martinez Gardea could have been 100 years old today. 

He was born on April 15, 1917 in New Mexico. His parents were both born in Mexico. His father was an oil refinery truck driver. Armando had two younger sisters. By 1940 Armando had moved way from home. He had completed high school and found work as a typist.

Armando enlisted in the army on November 18, 1943. He became a private in the 115th Infantry Regiment, 29th Infantry Division (Nicknamed "The Blue and Gray"). The 29th Division was already in England when Pvt. Gardea enlisted, so he was most likely a replacement soldier. The 115th Infantry Regiment landed on D-Day and was engaged in fighting for the next couple of weeks. It suffered many casualties at Omaha Beach and in the Normandy hedgerows, requiring many replacements to bring them up to strength. 29th Division casualties in Normandy were unbelievably high -- 2,500 killed and 8,000 wounded.  Keep in mind that a World War II infantry division had about 15,000 men.

Operation Cobra finally resulted in the breakout from Normandy by the end of July. The 115th Regiment was on the attack towards the town of Vire. On August 4, 1944 it encountered heavy resistance that resulted in the death of Pvt. Gardea. He was one of 21 of the Blue and Gray Division men who died that day.

Pvt. Gardea was near Vire when he was killed in action.
http://www.battleofnormandytours.com/uploads/2/5/1/7/2517577/2109821_orig.jpg

His remains were returned to be buried at Fort Bliss National Cemetery in El Paso, Texas.

Thank you Armando for your sacrifice. Let's Earn It for Armando.


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Friday, April 14, 2017

WW2 Fallen - Francis Wai, Medal of Honor Hero

Medal of Honor Hero Captain Francis Wai, 34th Infantry Regiment.
http://www.history.army.mil/news/2014/141200a_mohWai.html 

Medal of Honor recipient Francis Brown Wai could have been 100 years old today. 

He was born on April 14, 1917 in Hawaii. His parents were also both born in Hawaii with grandparents from China. His father was a banker and real estate businessman. Francis had three younger brothers and a younger sister. By 1940 Francis had completed four years of college at UCLA with a degree in economics (or maybe finance). While at UCLA he lettered in four sports and was a star on the football team.

He joined the Hawaiian National Guard on October 15, 1940 as a private but was quickly advanced to the rank of lieutenant. At some point after that he married Louise Wai. On September 27, 1941 Francis joined the Army and was assigned to the 34th Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division and rose to the rank of captain. He was an eyewitness to the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor.

By the fall of 1944 the 34th Infantry Regiment was involved in the return to the Philippines. Captain Wai landed with the fifth wave on Red Beach at the Leyte invasion October 20, 1944. He would not survive the day.

This map shows the movement of the 34th on the day Captain Wai was killed.https://www.ibiblio.org/hyperwar/USA/USA-P-Return/USA-P-Return-5.html

Captain Wai's Medal of Honor citation is as follows:

Captain Francis B. Wai distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action, on 20 October 1944, in Leyte, Philippine Islands. 

Captain Wai landed at Red Beach, Leyte, in the face of accurate, concentrated enemy fire from gun positions advantageously located in a palm grove bounded by submerged rice paddies. Finding the first four waves of American soldiers leaderless, disorganized, and pinned down on the open beach, he immediately assumed command. Issuing clear and concise orders, and disregarding heavy enemy machine gun and rifle fire, he began to move inland through the rice paddies without cover. 

The men, inspired by his cool demeanor and heroic example, rose from their positions and followed him. During the advance, Captain Wai repeatedly determined the locations of enemy strong points by deliberately exposing himself to draw their fire. In leading an assault upon the last remaining Japanese pillbox in the area, he was killed by its occupants. 

Captain Wai’s courageous, aggressive leadership inspired the men, even after his death, to advance and destroy the enemy. His intrepid and determined efforts were largely responsible for the rapidity with which the initial beachhead was secured. Captain Wai’s extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty are in keeping with the highest traditions of military service and reflect great credit on him, his unit, and the United States Army.

Captain Wai was originally recognized with the Distinguished Service Cross. Perhaps reflecting the bigotry of the times, Asian American WW2 soldiers often did not receive the level of recognition that they deserved. In 1996 Congress directed a review of military records which identified Captain Wai and 21 other Asian Americans as worthy of the Medal of Honor. Captain Wai remains the only American of Chinese descent to earn the Medal of Honor.

His remains were returned to be buried at the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific. His wife remarried after Wai's death.

Thank you Francis for your sacrifice. Let's Earn It for Francis.


On behalf of the fallen, if you would like to see more people become aware of this project to honor the WW2 fallen, be sure to share with others on Twitter, Facebook, etc. Thanks for your interest!

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Thursday, April 13, 2017

WW2 Fallen - Armstead Ross, 2nd Marine Division

Lt. Armstead Ross was with the 2nd Marine Regiment that landed on Tarawa on the first day of the battle.
https://www.pinterest.com/pin/493707177876156553/ 

Armstead Earl Ross could have been 100 years old today. 

He was born on April 13, 1917 in Alabama. His mother was also born in Alabama. His father was born in Mississippi and worked as a farmer and later as a retail groceries merchant and even later as a men's clothing salesman. Armstead had five older brothers and an older sister. 

Armstead enlisted in the Marines on May 28, 1940 as private. By April 1942 he was corporal. Within a year he rose to the rank of 2nd lieutenant and in July 1943 was assigned as a replacement to Company A, 2nd Marine Regiment, 2nd Marine Division. By November he was a 1st lieutenant.

Lt. Armstead participated in the Battle of Tarawa, where for the first time Japanese forces contested an invasion at the beaches. Lt. Armstead was among the 5,000 Marines that landed on November 20, 1943, the first day of the attack. The Marines were pinned to the beach from the start and advances were costly and limited. The first-day Marines suffered 30 percent casualties. Lt. Armstead was one of those killed in action.

His remains were returned to be buried at National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific.

Thank you Armstead for your sacrifice. Let's Earn It for Armstead.

Lt. Ross is the 100th serviceman or woman profiled so far by the WW2 Fallen 100 project. These 100 people are represented by just one of the 4,048 gold stars in the Freedom Wall at the National World War II Memorial. 


https://pixabay.com/p-938576/?no_redirect
While I am able to select one of these Americans to profile each day, it would take more than 1,100 years to profile them all at one per day. Hopefully those selected can represent the others not profiled. I'm always willing to take recommendations of fallen to profile for the balance of this year and even into 2018. Let me know if you have any suggestions for those born 100 years ago.

On behalf of the fallen, if you would like to see more people become aware of this project to honor the WW2 fallen, be sure to share with others on Twitter, Facebook, etc. Thanks for your interest!

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