Friday, June 30, 2017

WW2 Fallen - Francis Meredith, B-29 Bombardier in China

Lt. Francis Meredith was a bombardier for B-29s in the 468th Bombardment Group similar to the one in this picture.
http://www.usmilitariaforum.com/forums/index.php?/topic/267236-cadet-yearbook-of-kia-bombadier/ 

Francis E. Meredith never had a chance to reach 100 years old today. Instead, he sacrificed his life for our freedom.

He was born on June 30, 1917 in Texas. His parents were also both born in Texas. His father worked as a barber. Francis had an older brother and a younger brother. By 1940 he was still living at home while attending North Texas Teachers College.

He enlisted in the army on January 9, 1943 and became a second lieutenant in the 792nd Bombardment Squadron, 468th Bombardment Group, 20th Air Force.

The 792nd Bomb Squad was one of the first units designated to fly the new B-29 Superfortress bombers. The unit was operating out of India and China at the time of Lt. Meredith's death. On November 21, 1944 Lt. Meredith's plane was assigned to participate in a long distance mission to bomb Omura, Japan. He was the bombardier. His plane crashed after taking off from Peng-Shun, China at night. One man survived and the other ten, including Lt. Meredith, were killed.

His grave is at Odd Fellows Cemetery, Denton, Texas.

Thank you Francis for your sacrifice. Let's Earn It for Francis.


On behalf of the fallen, if you would like to see more people become aware of this project to honor the WW2 fallen, be sure to share with others on Twitter, Facebook, etc. Thanks for your interest!

To mark having over 100,000 visits to my project to honor the fallen of WW2 on their 100th birthdate, I created this video to share. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vXt8QA481lY


Follow on Twitter @ww2fallen100
Join the public Facebook group WW2 Fallen 100

Thursday, June 29, 2017

WW2 Fallen - Leslie Jackson, segregated 784th Tank Battalion

Sgt. Jackson was in the segregated 784th Tank Battalion.
http://forum.worldoftanks.com/index.php?/topic/262231-nothing-but-the-best/ 

Leslie J. Jackson never had a chance to reach 100 years old today. Instead, he sacrificed his life for our freedom.

He was born on June 29, 1917 in Mississippi. His mother was also born in Mississippi while his father was born in South Carolina. He was raised on his grandmother's Mississippi farm. The status of his parents is unknown and he was likely an only child. By 1940 Leslie had completed two years of high school, was working as bridge construction laborer, and was married to his wife Fannie Mae. I don't know if they had any children.

He enlisted in the army on March 25, 1943. He became a tech sergeant in Company A, 784th Tank Battalion. The 784th Tank battalion was one of three segregated tank units that fought in Europe with whites as senior officers and blacks as the junior officers and enlisted men. It arrived in France on Christmas Day and attached to various infantry divisions fighting in France, Belgium and Holland. Sgt. Jackson would have been part of an M4 Sherman tank crew. By early March 1945 the 784th was attached to the 35th Infantry Division advancing to the Rhine River near Rheinberg. Sgt. Jackson was killed on March 6, 1945 by enemy paratroopers who opposed the Sherman tanks with self propelled guns and panzerfast anti-tank weapons.

His grave is at St. John Cemetery in Janice, Mississippi. Fannie Mae never remarried and died in 2003.

Thank you Leslie for your sacrifice. Let's Earn It for Leslie.


On behalf of the fallen, if you would like to see more people become aware of this project to honor the WW2 fallen, be sure to share with others on Twitter, Facebook, etc. Thanks for your interest!

To mark having over 100,000 visits to my project to honor the fallen of WW2 on their 100th birthdate, I created this video to share. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vXt8QA481lY


Follow on Twitter @ww2fallen100
Join the public Facebook group WW2 Fallen 100

Wednesday, June 28, 2017

WW2 Fallen - Widower Van Payne, 90th Infantry Division

Staff Sergeant Van Payne, 90th Infantry Division was killed near Metz, France
where these 90th troops were photographed.
https://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=5180480
http://warfarehistorynetwork.com/wp-content/uploads/Q-Lorraine5-1.jpg

Van L. Payne never had a chance to reach 100 years old today. Instead, he sacrificed his life for our freedom.

He was born on June 28, 1917 in Iowa. His mother was also born in Iowa and his father was born in Nebraska. His father worked as a farmer. Van had one younger sister and three younger brothers. (All three of his brothers served in the army during the war and returned safely home.) By 1940 Van had moved off the farm. He worked for a meat packing business in Ottumwa. 

He was married to Sarah Louise Anderson Payne. She died of double lobar pneumonia on June 11, 1940.  They had one son who died before Van.

He enlisted in the army on March 18, 1942. He became a staff sergeant in Company B, 1st Battalion, 358th Infantry Regiment, 90th Infantry Division (nicknamed "Tough 'Ombres").

The 90th Infantry Division landed on Utah Beach on D-Day through D+4. It took part in heavy fighting in Normandy and across France.

Sgt. Payne was wounded during July and was awarded a Purple Heart medal. His wound was not serious enough to keep him out of the fighting so he returned to his unit.

Sgt. Payne died on September 10, 1944 when the Tough 'Ombres were advancing from Verdun to Metz.

His grave is at Pattison Cemetery in Fairfield, Iowa.

Thank you Van for your sacrifice. Let's Earn It for Van.


On behalf of the fallen, if you would like to see more people become aware of this project to honor the WW2 fallen, be sure to share with others on Twitter, Facebook, etc. Thanks for your interest!

To mark having over 100,000 visits to my project to honor the fallen of WW2 on their 100th birthdate, I created this video to share. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vXt8QA481lY


Follow on Twitter @ww2fallen100
Join the public Facebook group WW2 Fallen 100

Tuesday, June 27, 2017

WW2 Fallen 100 - Edward Madigan, the artist Disney missed

Sgt. Edward Madigan painted the nose art on many bombers in the 347th Bombardment Squadron.
https://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=3471023
http://www.americanairmuseum.com/unit/4003 

Edward T. Madigan never had a chance to reach 100 years old today. Instead, he sacrificed his life for our freedom.

He was born on June 27, 1917 in Minnesota. His parents were also both born in Minnesota. Edward's father died on October 8, 1918, one of the millions who died from the worldwide influenza epidemic. Ed and his mother lived with her parents. His grandfather supported the family working as a house decorator. His mother was a telephone operator. Ed's grandfather died when Ed was ten years old. His mother remarried in the 1920s. His stepfather was a railroad switchman. Ed had one half-brother and one half-sister.

Ed was drafted into the army in 1942 and became a sergeant in the 347th Bombardment Squadron, 99th Bombardment Group and served as a B-17 flight engineer. The 99th Bomb Group's first missions were based out of North Africa in March 1943. During 1943 most of its targets were in Sicily and Italy.  By December 1943 it moved its base to Tortorella, Italy.

Sgt. Madigan was a talented artist. In fact, before the war there was talk about him getting a job with the Disney Studios. He painted the nose art for many of the planes at his airbase.

On January 24, 1944 the 347th Bomb Squad was assigned a mission to Salon de Provence in France. Sgt. Madigan volunteered as a last minute crew member on the B-17 Stardust. The regular flight engineer was not available. Stardust was assigned to bomb a separate target about a mile away from the main target, so it was alone, without any fighter protection, when it was attacked by a number of ME-109s. In short time, only the #4 engine was working and the plane began a slow turning descent. The pilot ordered everyone to bail from the plane. The pilot and one of the waist gunners were able to evade capture with the help of the French resistance and escaped to Spain. Seven others of the crew were captured and sent to POW camps. Sgt. Madigan never jumped out of the plane (perhaps he was wounded) and died when it crashed.

His grave is at Fort Snelling National Cemetery, Minneapolis, Minnesota.

Thank you Edward for your sacrifice. Let's Earn It for Edward.


On behalf of the fallen, if you would like to see more people become aware of this project to honor the WW2 fallen, be sure to share with others on Twitter, Facebook, etc. Thanks for your interest!

To mark having over 100,000 visits to my project to honor the fallen of WW2 on their 100th birthdate, I created this video to share. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vXt8QA481lY


Follow on Twitter @ww2fallen100
Join the public Facebook group WW2 Fallen 100

Monday, June 26, 2017

WW2 Fallen - Edward Michalski, 29th Infantry Division

Wedding picture of Pvt. Edward Michalski and his wife Evelyn. Their son's name was Gerald Edward.
https://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=pv&GRid=38693404&PIpi=62502411 
Edward P. Michalski never had a chance to reach 100 years old today. Instead, he sacrificed his life for our freedom.

He was born on June 26, 1917 in Minnesota. His mother was also born in Minnesota while his father was born in Wisconsin. All four of his grandparents came from the Polish area of what was then part of Germany. His father worked as a machine shop woodworker and later an ice fruit truck driver. Edward had one older sister, two younger sisters, and one younger brother. By 1940 Edward was also working as a truck driver while living at home with his parents. He had completed two years of high school. Ed married his wife Evelyn sometime after the 1940 census. They had one son.

He enlisted in the army on October 30, 1943. He would ultimately serve as a private in Company K, 3rd Battalion, 175th Infantry Regiment, 29th Infantry Division (Nicknamed "Blue and Gray"). However, when Pvt. Michalski joined the army, the 29th Infantry was already in England so he did not land on Omaha Beach with the 175th Infantry Regiment on D-Day. 

The Blue and Gray lost 742 dead and nearly 3,000 wounded during the Normandy invasion through the month of June 1944. Pt. Michalski probably joined his division after D-Day as a replacement. He fought in the Battle of St. Lo during July. Pvt. Michalski, and 41 other GIs from the 29th Infantry Division, died on the day the town was captured -- July 17, 1944.

His grave is at St. Mary's Cemetery, Winona, Minnesota. His widow remarried after Edward died. She died in 1998. If his son is still living, he would be in his mid-seventies.

Thank you Edward for your sacrifice. Let's Earn It for Edward.


On behalf of the fallen, if you would like to see more people become aware of this project to honor the WW2 fallen, be sure to share with others on Twitter, Facebook, etc. Thanks for your interest!

To mark having over 100,000 visits to my project to honor the fallen of WW2 on their 100th birthdate, I created this video to share. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vXt8QA481lY


Follow on Twitter @ww2fallen100
Join the public Facebook group WW2 Fallen 100

Sunday, June 25, 2017

WW2 Fallen - Coast Watcher Judge Trammell

Sgt. Judge Trammel was posthumously awarded the Distinguished Service Cross.
https://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=110609146&ref=acom 
UPDATED 8/13/2017

Seventy-five years ago today newspapers across the country ran headlines about the early success of American servicemen in the Solomon Island.  At home the favorite song was Jingle Jangle Jingle by Kay Kyser. Folks were going to the movies to watch Cary Grant in Talk of the Town or Gary Cooper in Pride of the Yankees. That Thursday night, families could listen to The Rudy Vallee Show or Death Valley Days on the radio.

August 13, 1942 was also a day that would see the demise of at least 53 Americans who died serving their country that day. One of them was Judge Y. Trammell, Jr.

Judge was profiled here on his 100th birthday back in June. If you missed it, here is his story told on the 75th anniversary of his death.

He was born on June 25, 1917 in North Carolina. His mother also born in North Carolina while his father was born in Alabama. His father ran a grocery store and later worked as a realtor. Judge had three older sisters, one older brother, one younger brother and one younger sister. 

He enlisted in the army in 1939. At some point after the 1940's census, Judge married his wife Hilde. They had one son.

He became a sergeant in the headquarters battery of the 4th Field Artillery Battalion. Sgt. Trammel volunteered to set up a scouting outpost on an enemy held island in the South Pacific. During July and August 1942 Sgt. Trammell was able to forward intelligence reports to American forces regarding Japanese movements that assisted the Guadalcanal campaign. While hiding out in the jungle for weeks on end, Sgt. Trammell succumbed to jungle fever and died on August 13, 1942. He was posthumously awarded the Distinguished Service Cross for his important coast watching operation.

His grave is at Carolina Memorial Park in Concord, North Carolina. His widow remarried after his death. She died in 1964.

Thank you Judge for your sacrifice. Let's Earn It for Judge.


On behalf of the fallen, if you would like to see more people become aware of this project to honor the WW2 fallen, be sure to share with others on Twitter, Facebook, etc. Thanks for your interest!

To mark having over 100,000 visits to my project to honor the fallen of WW2 on their 100th birthdate, I created this video to share. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vXt8QA481lY. Now more than 200 fallen have been profiled with more than 200,000 visits. Is there interest in seeing a video highlighting those from the group of second 100?



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Saturday, June 24, 2017

WW2 Fallen - Noyes Farmer, USS Norman Scott

Lt. Noyes Farmer served on the USS Norman Scott, painted here by Wayne Scarpaci depicting the day it was hit.
https://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=55927175&ref=acom
http://www.navsource.org/archives/05/690.htm 

Noyes O. Farmer, Jr. never had a chance to reach 100 years old today. Instead, he sacrificed his life for our freedom.

He was born on June 24, 1917 in New Hampshire. His parents were also both born in New Hampshire. His father worked as an auditor and later a woodworking plant general manager. and then as an analyst. Noyes had one younger sister. He attended Tufts University and transferred to Harvard University in 1939 were he studied chemistry.

He enlisted in the navy. By 1944 he was a lieutenant junior grade serving on the destroyer USS Norman Scott.

At some time during the war he married his wife Glenice.

The Norman Scott first saw action in February 1944 in the Gilbert and Marshal Islands. It provided fire support in the invasion of Saipan and Tinian. During the invasion of Tinian on July 24, 1944 it was hit by Japanese shore batteries. The captain of the Norman Scott and 21 other men including Lt. Farmer were killed.

His grave is at the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific in Honolulu. I don't know what happened to his widow.

Thank you Noyes for your sacrifice. Let's Earn It for Noyes.


On behalf of the fallen, if you would like to see more people become aware of this project to honor the WW2 fallen, be sure to share with others on Twitter, Facebook, etc. Thanks for your interest!

To mark having over 100,000 visits to my project to honor the fallen of WW2 on their 100th birthdate, I created this video to share. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vXt8QA481lY


Follow on Twitter @ww2fallen100
Join the public Facebook group WW2 Fallen 100

Friday, June 23, 2017

WW2 Fallen - POW William Burks, 99th Infantry Division

Sgt. William Burks was with the 393rd Infantry Regiment during the Battle of the Bulge.
https://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=103280506&ref=acom
https://www.pinterest.com/pin/469289223649876071/ 

William M. Burks, Jr. never had a chance to reach 100 years old today. Instead, he sacrificed his life for our freedom.

He was born on June 23, 1917 in Arkansas. His mother was also both born in Arkansas while his father was born in Tennessee. William had an older brother, two older sisters, a twin brother, and a younger brother. His mother died when William was nine years old.

He enlisted in the army on January 31, 1937. He last army assignment was as First Sergeant, Company D, 1st Battalion, 393rd Infantry Regiment, 99th Infantry Division. He was previously a first sergeant in the 7th Infantry Division which saw action in Alaska at the Battle of Attu. The 99th Infantry Division was a late arrival to the European Theater so it made sense to have seasoned non-coms like Sgt. Burks in leadership positions.

The 99th had seen little action when it found itself in front of the initial German attack during the Battle of the Bulge on December 16, 1944. Sgt. Burks was captured the next day and sent to a POW camp.  He contracted pneumonia and died on January 25, 1945.

His grave is at Mount Carmel Cemetery, Cabot, Arkansas.

Thank you William for your sacrifice. Let's Earn It for William.


On behalf of the fallen, if you would like to see more people become aware of this project to honor the WW2 fallen, be sure to share with others on Twitter, Facebook, etc. Thanks for your interest!

To mark having over 100,000 visits to my project to honor the fallen of WW2 on their 100th birthdate, I created this video to share. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vXt8QA481lY


Follow on Twitter @ww2fallen100
Join the public Facebook group WW2 Fallen 100

Thursday, June 22, 2017

WW2 Fallen - Paul Yohannan, 88th Infantry Division

Pfc. Paul Yohannan served in the 350th Infantry Regiment, 88th Infantry Division.
 1937 New Britain High School Yearbook
http://www.military.com/unitpages/unit.do?id=715928
Paul Yohannan never had a chance to reach 100 years old today. Instead, he sacrificed his life for our freedom.

He was born on June 22, 1917 in Connecticut. His parents were both born in Persia. His father worked as polisher in a lock factory. Paul had two younger sisters. By 1940 Paul had completed four years of high school and was still living with his parents.

He enlisted in the army on June 20, 1942. He became a private first class in Company A, 1st Battalion, 350th Infantry Division, 88th Infantry Division.

The 88th Infantry Division arrived in Italy in February 1944. It was on the line at the Garigliango River on March 4. No plans were made to advance forward along the front in this area during the spring. Engagement with the enemy was limited to patrols and reconnaissance. Nevertheless, Pfc. Yohannan was killed in action on April 24, 1944.

His grave is at Saint Thomas Cemetery, New Britain Connecticut.

Thank you Paul for your sacrifice. Let's Earn It for Paul.


On behalf of the fallen, if you would like to see more people become aware of this project to honor the WW2 fallen, be sure to share with others on Twitter, Facebook, etc. Thanks for your interest!

To mark having over 100,000 visits to my project to honor the fallen of WW2 on their 100th birthdate, I created this video to share. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vXt8QA481lY


Follow on Twitter @ww2fallen100
Join the public Facebook group WW2 Fallen 100

Wednesday, June 21, 2017

WW2 Fallen - John O'Leary, PBY-5 Officer

Ensign John O'Leary, PBY-5 officer, flew PBYs out of Jacksonville, Florida.
https://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=54156942&ref=acom
http://www.wikiwand.com/de/Consolidated_PBY
John James O'Leary never had a chance to reach 100 years old today. Instead, he sacrificed his life for our freedom.

He was born on June 21, 1917 in South Dakota. His mother was born in Iowa of Canadian parents. His father was born in Ireland and came to America as a baby in 1880. His father worked as a carpenter and later a building contractor. John had an older sister, four younger sisters and one younger brother. By 1940 the family had moved from South Dakota to Montana but John had already moved out.

John's enlistment date is unknown, but he became an ensign who served as part of a PBY-5 crew.
On January 28, 1945 the pilot attempted a single engine water landing on the St. Johns River in Florida, The plane made a turn too close to the water. The wing struck the water and was torn off while the plane's hull was crushed. There were eleven men on board and six were killed including Ensign O'Leary.

His grave is at Mountain View Cemetery, Billings, Montana.

Thank you John for your sacrifice. Let's Earn It for John.


On behalf of the fallen, if you would like to see more people become aware of this project to honor the WW2 fallen, be sure to share with others on Twitter, Facebook, etc. Thanks for your interest!

To mark having over 100,000 visits to my project to honor the fallen of WW2 on their 100th birthdate, I created this video to share. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vXt8QA481lY


Follow on Twitter @ww2fallen100
Join the public Facebook group WW2 Fallen 100

Tuesday, June 20, 2017

WW2 Fallen - Dale Modrell, 28th Infantry Division

Pvt. Dale Modrell, 28th Infantry Division.
https://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=13923464&ref=acom 

Dale Doyle Modrell never had a chance to reach 100 years old today. Instead, he sacrificed his life for our freedom.

He was born on June 20, 1917 in Nebraska. His parents were also both born in Nebraska. His father worked as a farmer. Dale had two older brothers, two younger sisters and one younger brother. By 1940 Dale had completed four years of high school and had moved to Colorado where he worked as a hired hand on a farm. He married his wife Anna on August 21, 1941 in Kansas. They had one daughter.

Dale enlisted in the armed services on March 18, 1943. He had been working in a meatpacking business. Dale arrived in Europe in September 1943 and became a private first class in Company B, 1st Battalion, 110th Infantry Regiment, 28th Infantry Division. Pvt. Modrell first entered combat on July 22, 1944. The 28th Infantry was active in Operation Cobra to break out of Normandy. One month later, the 28th Infantry marched in the parade to mark the liberation of Paris.

The 28th Infantry played a major role in the Battle of Hurtgen Forrest, the longest single battle ever fought by the US Army for nearly three months. The Americans lost 33,000 men killed and wounded during this battle.

Pvt. Modrell went missing in action on October 2, 1944 in Bleialf, Germany where his unit was attacking against the Siegfried Line. 

In the mid-1950s his remains were discovered by workmen installing a new power line.

His grave is at Twin Oaks Memorial Gardens in Albany, Oregon. After his death, his wife remarried and died in 1999.

Thank you Dale for your sacrifice. Let's Earn It for Dale.


On behalf of the fallen, if you would like to see more people become aware of this project to honor the WW2 fallen, be sure to share with others on Twitter, Facebook, etc. Thanks for your interest!

To mark having over 100,000 visits to my project to honor the fallen of WW2 on their 100th birthdate, I created this video to share. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vXt8QA481lY


Follow on Twitter @ww2fallen100
Join the public Facebook group WW2 Fallen 100

Monday, June 19, 2017

WW2 Fallen - Glenn Erickson, 8th Air Force

Pvt. Glen Erickson was an airman flying B-24s for the 701st Bombardment Squadron like this plane.
https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:701st_Bombardment_Squadron_-_B-24_Liberator.jpg 

Glenn K. Erickson never had a chance to reach 100 years old today. Instead, he sacrificed his life for our freedom.

He was born on June 19, 1917 in North Dakota. His father was also born in North Dakota and his mother was born in Minnesota. Three of Glenn's grandparents were born in Norway. His father worked as farmer. Glenn had an older brother, a younger brother and two younger sisters. By 1940 Glenn had completed four years of high school and was living with his uncle while working as a truck driver.

He was a private in the 701st Bombardment Squadron, 445th Bombardment Group, 8th Air Force.
On August 26, 1944 the 701st Bomb Squad was part of a 109 bomber mission to bomb the chemical works at Ludwigshafen and marshaling yards at Ehrang and Kons/Karthaus. Despite an escort of 77 P-51s, 53 B-24s returned damaged and seven were lost, including Pvt. Erickson's plane.

His grave is at Kindred Cemetery in Kindred, North Dakota.

Thank you Glenn for your sacrifice. Let's Earn It for Glenn.

On behalf of the fallen, if you would like to see more people become aware of this project to honor the WW2 fallen, be sure to share with others on Twitter, Facebook, etc. Thanks for your interest!

To mark having over 100,000 visits to my project to honor the fallen of WW2 on their 100th birthdate, I created this video to share. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vXt8QA481lY


Follow on Twitter @ww2fallen100
Join the public Facebook group WW2 Fallen 100

Sunday, June 18, 2017

WW2 Fallen - B-24 Bombardier Adolph Ornstein + famous actor born on the same day

Lt. Adolph Ornstein was a B-24 bombardier in the 719th Bombardment Squadron.
https://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=95438726
http://www.americanairmuseum.com/unit/4012 

Adolph Ornstein never had a chance to reach 100 years old today. Instead, he sacrificed his life for our freedom.

He was born on June 18, 1917 in New York. His father and mother were both born in Austria Hungary in what became Czechoslovakia after WWI. They came to America in1892 and 1900. His father worked in real estate. Adolph had one older brother.

Adolph had completed three years of college when he decided to enlist in the army on October 10, 1941. At some point he was assigned to the Army Air Corp. He became a 2nd lieutenant on July 11, 1942 and a B-24 bombardier in the 719th Bombardment Squad, 449th Bombardment Group, 15th Air Force.

The 449th Bomb Group arrived in the Mediterranean in December 1943. It set up its airbase near Taranto, Italy. On April 4, 1944 twenty eight planes from the 449th bombed the marshaling yards in Bucharest, Romania. There was no fighter escort and the Germans attacked the American bombers with numerous fighters. The Americans claimed shooting down 40 enemy fighters, which was likely an overstatement. They lost seven planes of their own. Lt. Ornstein was killed in action on this mission. For this mission the 449th was awarded a Distinguished Unit Citation.
  
His grave is at Mount Ararat Cemetery, East Farmingdale, New York.

Thank you Adolph for your sacrifice. Let's Earn It for Adolph.

RICHARD BOONE

Also born on June 18, 1917 was the actor Richard Boone. Boone was primarily known for his work in westerns such as the TV show Have Gun Will Travel which aired for six years, and John Wayne's final movie, The Shootist. During World War 2 Boone served in the Navy which included flying as a gunner in Avenger torpedo bombers. Boone died in 1981.


Richard Boone in the navy and later as an actor.
https://www.pinterest.com/pin/126593439500693934/ 

On behalf of the fallen, if you would like to see more people become aware of this project to honor the WW2 fallen, be sure to share with others on Twitter, Facebook, etc. Thanks for your interest!

To mark having over 100,000 visits to my project to honor the fallen of WW2 on their 100th birthdate, I created this video to share. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vXt8QA481lY


Follow on Twitter @ww2fallen100
Join the public Facebook group WW2 Fallen 100

Saturday, June 17, 2017

WW2 Fallen - Clyde Boyd, USS St. Louis, kamikaze attack

Petty Officer Clyde Boyd, seen with his bride Virginia, was on the USS St. Louis when it was hit by a kamikaze plane.
https://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=52817529
http://www.worldwarphotos.info/wp-content/gallery/usa/us-navy/USS_St._Louis_CL-49_being_hit_by_Japanese_kamikaze_Plane_off-of_LEYTE_Island.jpg

Clyde Roe Boyd never had a chance to reach 100 years old today. Instead, he sacrificed his life for our freedom.

He was born on June 17, 1917 in Texas. His parents were also both born in Texas. His father worked as a farmer. Clyde had an older brother, two older sisters, and one younger brother. By 1940 Clyde had completed four years of high school and was working as a government foreman of laborers while still living with his parents.

He enlisted in the US Navy on January 23, 1941. Muster rolls show he was serving on the light cruiser USS St. Louis in December 1941 which means he was probably at Pearl Harbor when the Japanese bombed the Pacific Fleet. He rose to the rank of radioman 2nd class.

Muster rolls show he was serving on the light cruiser USS Honolulu in March 1944, likely transferred there while the St. Louis was undergoing repairs caused by damage from Japanese dive-bombers in January. He was again serving on the St Louis by September when it was back in California for an overhaul. It was during these repairs that Petty Officer Boyd married his wife Virginia on September 30, 1944.

By November 16 the St. Louis was on station in Leyte Gulf. On November 27 the St. Louis came under attack of kamikaze planes. Most missed but two of them hit, killing 16 men. Boyd was one of 21 men who were seriously injured. He was evacuated to receive better medical attention but he succumbed to his wounds on December 9, 1944.

His grave is at Oakwood Cemetery, Waco, Texas. Clyde had one daughter who was born after he died. His wife remarried after Clyde's death and she died in 2000.

Thank you Clyde for your sacrifice. Let's Earn It for Clyde.


On behalf of the fallen, if you would like to see more people become aware of this project to honor the WW2 fallen, be sure to share with others on Twitter, Facebook, etc. Thanks for your interest!

To mark having over 100,000 visits to my project to honor the fallen of WW2 on their 100th birthdate, I created this video to share. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vXt8QA481lY


Follow on Twitter @ww2fallen100
Join the public Facebook group WW2 Fallen 100